Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 439 – Stephen Griffiths, Director of Insights at Level2, on Trends in Market Research

My guest today is Stephen Griffiths, Director of Insights at Level2. Level2’s mission is remission for people with type 2 diabetes. Level2 is an all new personalized, digital care experience complete with coaching and clinical care, and informed by the latest in diabetes technology wearables. 

With real-time information on how food, movement, stress, and sleep all impact glucose levels, Level2 helps people make small changes for big impact. 

Prior to joining Level2, Stephen has been in many big companies and is the host of Digging for insights.

Find Stephen Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephenrgriffiths/ 

Website: https://mylevel2.com/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 

This Episode is Sponsored by:

This episode is brought to you by Michigan State’s Marketing Research program. Are you looking for higher pay, to expand your professional network, and to achieve your full potential in the world of market research?

Today, the program has tracks for both full-time students and working professionals.

They also provide career support assisting students to win today’s most sought-after jobs. In fact, over 80% of Michigan State’s Marketing Research students have accepted job offers 6 months prior to graduating.

The program has three formats:

  • The first is a Full-Time 100% Online program taught over 12-months starting in January 2022
  • The second is a Part-Time 100% Online program that is 20-months. This one starts in May 2022 and is specifically designed for working professionals,
  • And of course, they offer a Full-Time 12-month in-person experience that starts in September 2022

All programs include real-world experience and full-time job placement support.

If you are looking to achieve your full potential, check out MSMU’s programs at:

broad.msu.edu/marketing 

It costs nothing to get more details. Take the time, invest in yourself. You are worth it and your future self will thank you. Class sizes are limited, so please, check it out today. 


This Episode is Sponsored by:

This episode is brought to you by Momentive. You may have heard that SurveyMonkey’s parent company recently rebranded as Momentive, a leader in agile insights and experience management. The Momentive AI-powered insights platform is built for the pace of modern business so you can deeply understand your market, elevate your brand, and build winning products faster. 

Momentive offers 22 purpose-built market research solutions that incorporate an AI engine, built-in expertise, sophisticated methodologies, and an integrated global panel of over 144M people to deliver meaningful insights in hours, not months. Momentive also has a team of market research consultants that can take on anything from research design to custom reporting as needed, so you can spend more time shaping what’s next for your organization.

To learn more, visit momentive.ai 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Hey everybody. I’m Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Research Podcast. My guest today is Stephen Griffiths, Director of Insights at Level2. Level2’s mission is remission for people with Type 2 diabetes. Level2 is an all new personalized digital care experience complete with coaching and clinical care. And informed by the latest in diabetes technology wearables. With real time information on how food, movement, stress and sleep all impact glucose levels. Level2 helps people make small changes for big impact. I know that sounded like a little bit of an infomercial, so I do apologize. I’m not trying to sell you Level2. I do feel like it is important though for you to level set with what the business does because I think many of you may not be familiar. Prior to joining Level2, Stephen has been in many big companies. I think all of you know him as the host of Digging for Insights. Stephen welcome to the show.

[00:01:05]

Stephen Griffiths: Great, Jamin. Great to be here.

[00:01:11]

Jamin Brazil: As you know, I’ve done hundreds of interviews with today’s top minds in marketing research. Many of them trace their roots to Michigan State’s marketing research program. Are you looking for higher pay to expand your professional network and to achieve your full potential in the world of market research. Here’s some good news. The program has tracks for both full time students and working professionals. They also provide career support assisting students to win today’s most sought after jobs. In fact, over 80 percent of Michigan State’s marketing students have accepted job offers six months prior to graduating. The program has three formats. The first, full time, 100 percent online program taught over 12 months and it starts this January. The second is a part time, 100 percent online program that’s spread over 20 months. This one starts in May and is specifically designed for working professionals. Of course they have their full time, 12 month in-person experience that starts September 2022. All programs include real world experience and full time job placement support. If you are looking to achieve your full potential check out MSU’s program at B-R-O-A-D, that’s broad, dot MSU dot EDU slash marketing. That’s broad.msu.edu/marketing. It costs nothing to get more details. Take the time. Invest in yourself. You are worth it. And your future self will thank you. Class sizes are limited so please check them out today. This episode is brought to you by Momentive. You may have heard that Survey Monkey’s parent company recently rebranded as Momentive, a leader in agile insights and experience management. The Momentive AI powered insights platform is built for the pace of modern business so you can deeply understand your market, elevate your brand and build winning products faster. Momentive offers 22 purpose built market research solutions that incorporate an AI engine, built in expertise, sophisticated methodologies, and an integrated global panel of over a 144 million people to deliver meaningful insights in hours not months. Momentive also has a team of market research consultants that can take on anything from research design to custom reporting as needed. So you can spend more time shaping what’s next for your organization. To learn more visit Momentive. AI, that’s M-O-M-E-N-T-I-V-E dot AI. Let’s start with the context. Tell us about your parents and how they informed what you do today?

[00:03:46]

Stephen Griffiths: Sure. My dad was a US Diplomat working in the Foreign service. I’d say the two main things that I learned from him was one, this eagerness for analysis. He worked in helping create economic policies for the US Government as well as understanding the political agenda. And so he would do everything from talking to people on the street, to negotiating, to looking at economic data. This ability of his to sort of put it all together and making recommendations for what the embassy or the consulate should do and what the US government should do for policy makers was a big part of what he did. It took me a while to realize that I think I have some of that as well. I love taking different disparate pieces of data. How do we analyze those. Understand the bias and then make recommendations that matter. I’d say the second part is I’m also interested in international things. I think this focus in different perspectives. My dad was always thinking about this is how people view things in the Thai culture or in China or in other places. It’s that curiosity of why people think, why people make the decisions they do has influenced my decision to work in marketing research. My mom was a stay at home mom and she was very busy as I think all stay at home moms are. She specifically did a couple things. Was always trying to learn and improve. She always had a book on tape. I remember one time getting into a car in high school and I think she left on some tape about like antelopes in the wild or something like that. I’m this awkward teenager who’s taking a couple of new friends, once I got my driver’s license. I turn on the car and there’s like the antelopes in the wild gently move across. My friends are all looking at me like what do you listen to, Stephen. That was my mom. She just learned things all the time and had lots of ways to do that. That’s something I really learned from her is the curiosity about the world and always wanting to learn. She did a great job of keeping in touch with friends and family even though she lived over seas a lot. I have that as well. I enjoy keeping in touch with people and that’s meant a lot for the podcast as well.

[00:05:55]

Jamin Brazil: You lived overseas for a little while in Beijing, right? As the Press and Cultural Affairs Assistant to the US Embassy?

[00:06:05]

Stephen Griffiths: I did, yes. I worked in the US Embassy in Beijing during one of my Summer internships during college. I had a chance to live in Asia quite a bit. Which is a great experience.

[00:06:12]

Jamin Brazil: You really started in market research at Nielson working on the BASES area. Then you transferred to Proctor & Gamble. Why did you decide to go client side?

[00:06:28]

Stephen Griffiths: Taking a step back. I actually fell into marketing research even before that. In high school I was a mall interviewer. They don’t have them as often anymore but that annoying guy that’s in the mall with a clipboard. Please can you answer a survey. Please answer a survey. I did that as an hourly job in high school. Then you’re exactly right, during actually my time in Thailand, I worked for General Motors in Thailand and did market research for them as well. More office desk research. Then you’re right worked at Nielson, supplier side. Then switched to P&G. At the time, I specifically left Nielson to get an MBA because I wanted to do client side experience and do that kind of research. I loved presenting the sort of classic consultant’s dilemma. I really enjoyed doing the research, analyzing it, coming up with the recommendations. So often you hand off a piece of research to someone and you don’t know what happens to it. Either they act on it or they don’t. You don’t really know why. I really wanted to make not just deliver research but really see it to implementation. That’s one of the big reasons why I wanted to switch to client side. Which I’ve pretty much stuck with since then.

[00:07:39]

Jamin Brazil: Of course. Before Level2, global consumer insights for Cheerios. One of my favorite brands. Breakfast brands.

[00:07:51]

Stephen Griffiths: Cheerios would love to hear that you’re a fan.

[00:07:53]

Jamin Brazil: It’s part of our household ritual. It’s kind of a funny thing.

[00:07:54]

Stephen Griffiths: It was really fun. I spent six years at General Mills and doing lots of different things. At some large companies you get to do rotations. So, I did analytics for snack bars like Nature Valley and Larabar and Fiber One bar. Then was on a community food service. I helped launch the Pillsbury stuffed waffles. Imagine a breakfast sandwich encased in a waffle, maple infused waffle. It’s sold warm at 7-11 so that’s what I launched there. Then I spent my last time, you’re exactly right, at Cheerios on the breakfast desk also working on new innovations. It was just really fun to touch a lot of parts of the business and get some great experiences. I really enjoyed my time at General Mills.

[00:08:32]

Jamin Brazil: For sure. Let’s switch gears and talk a little bit about podcasting. Which you and I of course even before you hit record, start talking about podcasting. Digging for Insights. Tell us why did you start the show?

[00:08:46]

Stephen Griffiths: It was about a year and a half almost two years ago now when basically I just remembered getting into podcasts and realizing there weren’t a lot of people talking about market research topics. I think you were the only podcast that I knew of at the time who was talking about it. I thought you know I’d love to have someone who has more of a client side perspective. I bet there’s others who would appreciate that perspective as well. It’s really three reasons that it came down for me. One was to give back. I was unemployed right after I got out of undergrad during the great recession. Would’ve loved to have had podcasts to listen to to understand and explore different careers. I wanted to give back in that way. I also really like to learn. Sometimes the best way to get ahold of someone to chat is by doing a podcast episode with them. I say the third part is connecting. It’s a small world within marketing research and having another opportunity to connect with others is really important to me.

[00:09:37]

Jamin Brazil: Do you have, I’m not saying a favorite guest but do you have like a standout guest that you’d like to highlight?

[00:09:44]

Stephen Griffiths: It’s hard to pick a favorite. There’s a lot of really good guests I’ve had. One I really did enjoy talking to Rogier Verhulst. He’s the head of marketing research at LinkedIn and also authored a book. And is just really cool. He shared this experience of leaving marketing research to do a different kind of role. Then coming back into a leadership role. Then he’s obviously the head of marketing research. He’s been very successful there. Just this idea of like being open to flex your career and follow your passions and not feeling like you always have to consistently climb the ladder with every role. I thought was really impressive.

[00:10:19]

Jamin Brazil: Rogier was my first client side interview on the Happy Market Research Podcast.

[00:10:27]

Stephen Griffiths: No way. I didn’t realize that. That’s awesome.

[00:10:28]

Jamin Brazil: I’m very thankful for him. We’re coming out of a time where we’ve had to basically shelter in place. Even things like, basic things like going to the grocery store, we’re very limited. What are you taking out of that time that you will carry forward in either your career or personal life?

[00:10:50]

Stephen Griffiths: That was a trying time for everyone. I’d say for me I had little kids and was trying to school at home as well on top of work as many others did. It was very trying. I feel like what I learned from that opportunity was, one, how good it is to better connect with your kids. We had a lot more at home time with kids and family, which is great. I also think there’s down sides to that in not having some separation that you might normally want. It can get overwhelming at times. Just getting closer to kids and to family I think was one thing I realized. The second piece I would say was this opportunity to do more work life integration. It’s interesting in working at General Mills at the time, we often didn’t typically use video in a lot of our calls. I think there’s a lot of folks who maybe if they join on a Teams call or a Skype call maybe it’s just audio. It’s a little bit awkward to turn on your camera. I think getting to the point where that’s normalized and that’s the way to move forward has allowed me to have a lot more flexibility to still have a busy home life but also be able to be at the meetings. To show up and be present. Regardless of where I am. I’d say that’s one of the sort of the work-life flexibility is a big lesson I’ve learned from the epidemic.

[00:12:04]

Jamin Brazil: It used to be the case pre-COVID that in a video conference, only the weirdos showed their video. There’s social pressure. If one person didn’t then everybody else would slowly turn off their cameras. Now it’s the opposite. It’s like if you’re not sharing your video you’re apologizing to everybody else on the call.

[00:12:28]

Stephen Griffiths: It’s totally different norms than it was before. You’re exactly right.

[00:12:28]

Jamin Brazil: The theme that we’re talking about in this particular series are trends in marketing research. You’ve had client side, agency side experience across the board. From the production line of insights into quite literally in the data collection given that you’re doing in-mall intercepts, to the analysis, to the report writing. From your advantage point today, what are some of the most common methodologies that are used?

[00:13:03]

Stephen Griffiths: Happy to think about that a little bit. It’s been neat seeing research across different clients. At Nielson I worked with ten different mostly Fortune 500 clients, mostly consumer goods space. Then P&G and then General Motors during college. General Mills the last six years and then now United Health group and a startup within that which is Level2 which you mentioned. It’s been neat seeing- I feel like corporate research hasn’t shifted that much over the time that I’ve seen it. I think in terms of trends I do see a trend towards sort of two different streams of work. One is foundational. I think when you think of foundational that’s more traditional, big ticket items that think of like a segmentation or a market structure. Things of that nature that matter a lot. Then you also have the second stream of work which is more sort of adhoc questions that come up. I’m seeing a lot more do it yourself solutions within that adhoc space. Maybe in the past you would say, I want to learn my business had this question about our target consumer, we want to ask a handful of questions. Maybe you would reach out to a vendor who then creates a survey for you. You do a few rounds back and forth. Maybe two to three weeks later you field it. A week of fielding. Then you get results back a month later. That was the older way of doing things. I think we’re finding that that adhoc space is really being revolutionized right now. So you have solutions where you’re asking a question and one day you’re getting results back overnight in some cases or in a couple of days. Very quickly you’re getting results back at least within a week if not faster. I think the ability to do that means they’re also taking out of some of the complexity. This idea of you can go onto a platform and as a corporate researcher write your own questions and field it yourself and find the target audience and launch that quickly. I definitely think is a trend that we’re seeing for sure.

[00:15:06]

Jamin Brazil: The platforms clearly have democratized the research ops part of things. Let’s be honest, you knew how to do research ops in your first one year in the space. You understood the whole lifecycle of data. Beyond just the simplification of the processes, what are the types of research that are being done? Meaning the actual is it A and U. Is it ad testing? When you talk about quick turn, are there specific types of projects that are being done more than others?

[00:15:39]

Stephen Griffiths: For sure. Yes. I can give a little more details on those I mentioned earlier. The foundational ones, I still see those happening all the time. Typically, any company of any size if they’re doing like meaningful segmentation or market structure or like an A and U, as you talked about. It’s an Attitude and Usage study. I remember one client that I worked with, they did a really big study on how people are using their products. They found that over time some people like the technology had changed. How people were using the product had actually evolved and so that this was a cleaning product. It didn’t clean as well as it used to. They discovered, no one was overly saying hey this isn’t working as well but as they’re tracking these sort of foundational usage things over time they recognize this. They came up with an entire new product line that was very successful in market. For me, that’s still out there. You’re going to pay a researcher, research company good money to do those sort of foundational studies. I don’t see those being democratized, revolutionized as much as other things. I’d say with the new things, everything is being revolutionized. If you think about idea screening, concept testing kinds of things. Doing super interesting as you’ve probably followed in the conference space, the conference circuit. PepsiCo has done a lot of presentations about how they’ve streamlined things. Specifically, they moved away from an outside vendor to do their concept testing to doing it internally and using a vendor that basically have a streamlined short survey. They’re using their own internal benchmarks to do the analysis. I think they said like three four days after fielding, they can get results back. Which is way faster than traditional concept testing. I think that’s a place that’s being revolutionized for sure. Other adhoc questions. I also see a lot of IDIs. One on one interviews especially video with people is big. Whether it’s trying to identify someone in a specific- I remember and you probably read this online but P&G’s Gillette brand, whereas for a while I’m not sure if they still do this but they would identify these points of time in life stage where you’re mostly likely to use their products. They would say hey guys, usually when they’re graduating high school or going to college. This is the time for them to try out a new shaver. For a while they would actually mail really a nice expensive Gillette shavers to guys who were just graduating high school I think around their 18th birthday or something like that. Imagine you’re getting this really nice shaver in the mail, I guess I should use this, give it a try. For situations like that, where whatever company is trying to understand a specific group of consumers that’s where you might have this adhoc. There’s a lot of in terms of how do I understand them better, they might schedule a half a dozen one on one interviews to reach specifically if it were that case, 18 year olds who were about to have a birthday coming up and what their thoughts are regarding facial hair and what trimmers like to use. How they would use it. You could even on the call show the shaver and things like that. I have no idea if that actually happened. That’s the kind of usage case that companies would do to have those IDIs with their target members. Besides that it’s being revolutionized. It used to be two weeks of recruiting. You have a separate company that gets recruiting people and then you talk to them two weeks later. I think there’s a lot of other technologies now that allow that much faster. In a couple days you can identify someone. You can choose who you identify and screen and talk to them within the week. I think that’s probably the way of the future. I’d say the last little piece is more in terms of short term surveys. Survey research is not the end all, be all. There’s a lot of behavior that does not match up with what people say on a survey. Survey research I think is probably still here to say it is an important element to consider along with all the other information you have about your business. Just fast quick turn surveys that are mobile friendly and things like that are important. One usage case that I’m seeing a lot is, in context research. Especially for anyone who’s selling things like in a grocery store. There’s some pretty cool technology now where you’ll send people on a mobile journey. They’ll take their phone. They’ll walk into the store and they will literally hold up the phone walking around the store and talk about it. I’m going to go in this aisle. I’m want to go to this section. I want to look over here. They just walk through their experience. That alone is incredibility insightful for companies. You’re like wait a minute, are they looking for the brand first. Or are they looking at the price. Which part of our package. I’ve worked with companies before where they’re like everybody knows about our 5X stain removal power or something like that. It turns out, when people go in there all they notice is that your bottles are one color and the other bottles are a different color. Having that understanding is just really important when you’re designing packaging, you’re thinking about new product development. That’s another used case where I’ve seen where it used to be if you brought a phone and a camera into a store, people would freak out. Literally they would send the security and ask you to leave. All sorts of issues. Now, it’s pretty normal to be on your phone all the time. So this idea of getting in context research not just for in-stores but whether you’re doing things around the house or at work or anything else. Getting context what is actually happening as they’re using a product or service is much easier now than it’s ever been before.

[00:21:00]

Jamin Brazil: I had never actually consider that. I image the backlash if a store actually said you need to put your phone away.

[00:21:12]

Stephen Griffiths: Now, especially. Most stores they’re incentivizing. Almost all of them have some sort of online mobile reward program or incentivization thing where you need your phone. I think it’s very normal and it was not that way even just three to five years ago.

[00:21:24]

Jamin Brazil: Last question. What is your personal motto?

[00:21:29]

Stephen Griffiths: There’s this great quote from the Bible that I grew up with. Where you’re treasure is, there your heart is also. I’ve interpreted that to mean that whatever is most important to you, that’s what you’re going to be thinking about. That’s what’s going to be in your heart. So, I feel like as anyone who goes through life there’s periods of time where what you think and what you spend your time on doesn’t really reflect maybe what you should be thinking about. What’s really important to you. Making sure to have that sync of how am I spending my time. How am I- what am I thinking about and is that really focused on the most important stuff for me.

[00:22:11]

Jamin Brazil: My guest today has been Stephen Griffiths, Director of Insights at Level2. Stephen thank you very much for joining me on the Happy Market Research Podcast.

[00:22:17]

Stephen Griffiths: Glad to be here.

[00:22:18]

Jamin Brazil: Everyone else, screen capture. I just got a new batch of t-shirts FYI. So screen capture if you tag me on LinkedIn or Twitter with that image, then I will send you a free t- shirt. Have a good rest of your day.

Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 438 – CRC 2021 Highlights: Tiffany Dixon, Sr. VP Field Management at Murray Hill National

Welcome to the CRC 2021 Highlights Series. Recorded live in Dallas, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors, speakers and attendees at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Tiffany Dixon, Sr. VP Field Management at Murray Hill National. 

More about CRC 2021: https://www.insightsassociation.org/conference/crc-2021 

Find Tiffany Online:

Website: https://murrayhillnational.com/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Hey everybody. You are listening to the Happy Market Research podcast live at CRC. The Insights Association is hosting us here at – in Dallas, Texas. It is a big state. My guest, Tiffany Dixon, Murray Hill National. I have used Murray Hill for almost three decades if that tells you anything about how long I’ve been in this space. Big fan. Tiffany, welcome to the show.

[00:00:23]

Tiffany Dixon: Thank you very much. Happy to be here.

[00:00:25]

Jamin Brazil: So tell me a little bit about Murray Hill.

[00:00:27]

Tiffany Dixon: Sure. Our core business is recruiting. So we focus on mainly quant recruiting. We also do some qual as well. And we have a brick-and-mortar focus group based in Dallas and then we partner with other facilities across the nation. So we can host any methodology, online, in person, you name it. And we’ve got a proprietary panel. We do consumer B2B and health care. Health care consists of patients, doctors, nurses, everything under the gamut there. And that’s – we’re all based in Dallas. So our core recruiting company is – we’re all in Dallas here. Yes, which is nice, which has been great too because you know everybody talks about the pandemic and everything like that, but we were lucky enough to be you know back in the office together recruiting quick; very quick.

[00:01:18]

Jamin Brazil: For sure. Well this is one of the first back to physical space, in person – that’s the word for that – events in market research. What do you think about getting back in person?

[00:01:29]

Tiffany Dixon: Oh I think it’s great. I think it’s definitely past time. We needed this. Everybody needs to get back seeing people. I think you know when you stay at home I mean you naturally start to become a little bit introverted and you miss that camaraderie and just the personal interaction, and you know the ideas that bounce off of each other. When you’re you know stuck at home just behind your laptop you kind of lose that. You kind of – I feel like you lose.

[00:01:51]

Jamin Brazil: A hundred percent.

[00:01:53]

Tiffany Dixon: You lose the steam. And you know I like getting out every day and going to the office and going back home. It separates it, which is nice. And I think again, you’re more creative. You know I had brain mush sometimes when I was sitting at home. I was like I need to get out. I need interaction, so.

[00:02:10]

Jamin Brazil: So it’s been really good for you it sounds like.

[00:02:11]

Tiffany Dixon: Yes.

[00:02:12]

Jamin Brazil: And obviously having a focus group facility really good for that as well.

[00:02:14]

Tiffany Dixon: Exactly.

[00:02:15]

Jamin Brazil: Thinking about 2021, I mean the pandemic has really digitized market research. It’s kind of like a time machine. I feel like we went ten years in the future and now we’re like right here.

[00:02:25]

Tiffany Dixon: Yep.

[00:02:26]

Jamin Brazil: What do you see as a trend moving into 2022 as a result of the pandemic?

[00:02:30]

Tiffany Dixon: You know I think we’re going to continue to see the online research. I think it makes sense in a lot of different areas as far as – obviously it saves cost. You can still accomplish a lot of the same things. But I do see us moving again, toward the in person. I’m not sure that we will ever get back to where we were for in person just because there’s again, not only are the clients more adept to being able to do the interviews and stuff online; I think our respondents are as well. You know that was a little bit of a curve, learning curve right there, you know just making sure everybody was you know – knew how to use Zoom, you know what is Zoom. But now that the respondents are more capable and you don’t have that ten minutes trying to get them to connect sort of thing and we’ve kind of worked out all the kinks there. I think we will keep that trend going. But I also think you know obviously there’s a lot of studies that require the in person, the face-to-face, if you’re product testing, testing devices, that sort of thing, you obviously need that.

[00:03:36]

Jamin Brazil: That in-person experience.

[00:03:37]

Tiffany Dixon: In person, exactly.

[00:03:38]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, for sure. Tiffany Dixon, Murray Hill National is the name of the company. Look them up online. Thank you so much for being on the podcast.

[00:03:46]

Tiffany Dixon: Thank you. It was fun. Yay.

Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 437 – CRC 2021 Highlights: Sergio Oliveri, Digital and Social Content Marketing Manager at NetBase Quid

Welcome to the CRC 2021 Highlights Series. Recorded live in Dallas, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors, speakers and attendees at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Digital and Social Content Marketing Manager at NetBase Quid. 

More about CRC 2021: https://www.insightsassociation.org/conference/crc-2021 

Find Sergio Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sergiooliveri/ 

Website: https://netbasequid.com/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Hi everybody, live from CRC here in Dallas, Texas. Sergio Oliveri.

[00:00:07]

Sergio Oliveri: Yes. Sergio Oliveri, yup.

[00:00:08]

Jamin Brazil: Oliveri. Excuse me. Net Base Quid is the name of this.

[00:00:13]

Sergio Oliveri: Net Base Quid, got to love that name, right?

[00:00:15]

Jamin Brazil: Tell me a little bit about the company.

[00:00:16]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah, so Net Base Quid is an AI-powered consumer market intelligence tool. So basically we do social media listening and news media research.

[00:00:28]

Jamin Brazil: Got you.

[00:00:28]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah. So it’s a platform somebody subscribes to and then they get it for a year. And we have like billions of sources. It’s crazy. There’s.

[00:00:38]

Jamin Brazil: So tell me about the use case.

[00:00:39]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah, so for instance one of our customers, we work with a lot of big name brands, Yum Brands, Taco Bell. And we had a board member on the stage here at CRC in Dallas and he was talking about how he was part of the Taco Bell. He was the CMO of Taco Bell. And there’s a lot of different use cases with Taco Bell but one of my favorites is – so they’re trying to figure out how can they kind of – what could they do differently; what kind of – what’s out there; what are people talking about. And they discovered a big connection between Doritos and Taco Bell. So Doritos Locos Tacos.

[00:01:20]

Jamin Brazil: So they made that connection because they’re utilizing your platform and they saw the crossover?

[00:01:23]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah, exactly. So it kind of fuels the research.

[00:01:27]

Jamin Brazil: Understood. So it’s like fodder for ideas and projects.

[00:01:30]

Sergio Oliveri: Right. And it’s in real time. So even like Dick Clark Productions, they did one of these big award shows that they do and they have like this war room. So you could see host A, host B. They saw host A wasn’t doing as good as host B so they gave host B more stage time and they pivoted.

[00:01:48]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, makes sense. I love that.

[00:01:51]

Sergio Oliveri: There’s so many cool use cases. Go to NetBaseQuid.com/resources and you could see all of our testimonials and.

[00:01:58]

Jamin Brazil: Cool. We’re in person at CRC, which is pretty cool.

[00:02:01]

Sergio Oliveri: Isn’t it great?

[00:02:02]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, what do you think about that?

[00:02:03]

Sergio Oliveri: Right. I’ve been – my only commuting has been from my bedroom to my living room. Yeah. So now I get to actually get on a plane and go places, but I love it. I talked to a lot of people at this event too and they’re all loving it and you know it’s kind of a hybrid. It’s a virtual and in person. And I still think you know this is the first event that I’ve been to since COVID, right, first conference. So it’s good to be back and I mean just a little plug here, we’re doing our live conference, Net Base Quid Live in New York and LA. So New York is going to happen November.

[00:02:36]

Jamin Brazil: So you’re doing a hybrid?

[00:02:36]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah, we’re doing a hybrid model as well. But yeah, November 9th in New York and then November 16th in LA.

[00:02:42]

Jamin Brazil: What are people – what can participants expect to happen?

[00:02:47]

Sergio Oliveri: So we have guest speakers from – one of our guest speakers we’re working on, she’s a 2021 Nobel Peace Prize winner.

[00:02:56]

Jamin Brazil: OK, big deal.

[00:02:56]

Sergio Oliveri: Maria Ressa. And she’s in the media world out in the Philippines.

[00:03:03]

Jamin Brazil: Oh, got it.

[00:03:03]

Sergio Oliveri: And she spoke at one of the events in the past, I think in 2019 in New York. So we’re hoping to get her back and her story.

[00:03:10]

Jamin Brazil: I lived in the Philippines for a while.

[00:03:11]

Sergio Oliveri: Oh, no way. Really?

[00:03:12]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, long time ago.

[00:03:13]

Sergio Oliveri: Where did you – Manila I’m assuming, right?

[00:03:16]

Jamin Brazil: Just for a little bit. No, Olongapo specifically. Anyway, off topic. So that sounds pretty cool. I assume they can access – find you on the website, which of course I’ll link in the show notes.

[00:03:27]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah, exactly. And you’ll see we keep adding speakers, so.

[00:03:31]

Jamin Brazil: So 2020, 2021 pandemic, 2022 post-pandemic hopefully, what lessons have we learned or trends do you see that have developed in the last year, year and a half that will carry forward into 2022?

[00:03:47]

Sergio Oliveri: Well from a workplace, I think we’re seeing a lot more of this like kind of virtual, these hybrid events now. So I think that’s going to be a model that will continue until that fear or at least you know people start breaking away from that fear of traveling. So as long as that’s there.

[00:04:04]

Jamin Brazil: In reality that might always be part of the ethos of humanity, right?

[00:04:09]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah.

[00:04:09]

Jamin Brazil: There’s always going to be a subset of the population that is for whatever reason, incapable of travel.

[00:04:15]

Sergio Oliveri: Right. So I think you’ll see that model and people still working virtually too; not working at the office. But we at Net Base Quid are virtual but we also still you know have our events and we do – we have a presence, strong presence in Silicon Valley. So we sometimes get together and have like sessions where we’ll do something in person.

[00:04:36]

Jamin Brazil: Got it.

[00:04:36]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah. It’s a really cool company to work for and I’m – I’ve been with the company since 2016. I used to be in sales and now I’m in digital marketing. And I can’t tell you how many cool resources. Really though, check out our resources section on our website. There’s some fun stories.

[00:04:52]

Jamin Brazil: That’s free for.

[00:04:54]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah, totally. Just sign – there’s all kinds of – I do all the videos so.

[00:04:57]

Jamin Brazil: A little bias. I love it.

[00:04:59]

Sergio Oliveri: Yeah, I’m like a video guy now and no, it’s crazy how many customers are just willing to tell their story.

[00:05:06]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah. Sergio, it’s been a pleasure. Thank you.

[00:05:07]

Sergio Oliveri: Absolutely. Thank you.

[00:05:09]

Jamin Brazil: All right everybody, onto the next one.

Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 436 – CRC 2021 Highlights: Raj Manocha, CEO of Methodify

Welcome to the CRC 2021 Highlights Series. Recorded live in Dallas, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors, speakers and attendees at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Raj Manocha, CEO of Methodify.

More about CRC 2021: https://www.insightsassociation.org/conference/crc-2021 

Find Raj Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/raj-manocha-8616397/ 

Website: https://www.methodify.it/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Live from CRC here in Dallas. I’ve got Raj Manocha. Head of Sales CEO?

[00:00:09]

Raj Manocha: CEO of Methodify. CEO of one of our companies, yes.

[00:00:11]

Jamin Brazil: Of Delvinia.

[00:00:11]

Raj Manocha: Of Delvinia.

[00:00:12]

Jamin Brazil: That’s right.

[00:00:13]

Raj Manocha: So Delvinia is- owns a lot different things, holding company. We own a company called Asking Canadians, which is data collection. Methodify, which was a research automation platform. And we do some consulting for data collection for weird and wacky stuff as well. So my role I’m CEO of Methodify, but I look after all the revenue across the organization as well.

[00:00:31]

Jamin Brazil: Across the whole organization.

[00:00:31]

Raj Manocha: Yes.

[00:00:33]

Jamin Brazil: So dual role?

[00:00:33]

Raj Manocha: Dual role yes.

[00:00:34]

Jamin Brazil: That’s a heavy burden. For sure.

[00:00:37]

Raj Manocha: For sure. For sure but keeps it interesting. The world is moving at such a quick pace. And I think the industry itself is, particularly after COVID it’s just become so fast. So people want sample, they want automation, they want what’s the next big thing. So for us, it keeps it really interesting. For me, I love it. So there’s something new every single day, particularly with the Methodify business. COVID’s had this resurgence for research technology. You are seeing people buy it at unprecedented levels. Relooking at the research process, trying to get better, tighter, faster. And this word agile gets thrown around like crazy. But it’s not just about speed, it’s not just about cost, it’s about process, right? So how do we get better, more efficient? Our industry hasn’t really looked at process for such a long time. COVID was a great catalyst for that. So it’s been interesting for us. We’re up massively compared to last year and the year before that. So we expect big things, but I think the industry has really turned for a lot of this stuff as well.

[00:01:31]

Jamin Brazil: Right at the turn of the of the pandemic I had Adam on the show, and we had talked a lot about the transition that had taken place from in person to digital. Specifically around the workforce. Which has been pretty big. What sort of things are you guys taking out of that in terms of managing your workforce? Are you, now that things, are you retrenching back to in person or are you guys?

[00:01:58]

Raj Manocha: That’s a great question. So we believe in the right framework for what we need to do. And so that, for a lot of our US staff, they are remote. We finally had our entire US team in the same place yesterday. Which was great.

[00:02:11]

Jamin Brazil: Here in Dallas?

[00:02:11]

Raj Manocha: Here in Dallas, we had – we flew everybody in. We did a couple meetings, but we haven’t had the entire team meet everybody until the first time today or yesterday in person. So that was fantastic because that energy you can’t replace. Our head office in Toronto, what we end up doing is having people come in for the right types of meetings. So innovation, ideation, any sort of training, any onboarding, but some stuff, Zoom is very helpful. I think some folks, they have a lot more- They’re much more calm in their days when they’re working from home. But that doesn’t always mean it’s the best environment either. So we want this mixed hybrid role. Typically people are coming in one or two days a week, but it’s for the right types of things.

[00:02:50]

Jamin Brazil: It’s purpose built right?

[00:02:50]

Raj Manocha: Yes.

[00:02:52]

Jamin Brazil: Let’s get back to the business. Tell us about Methodify.

[00:02:55]

Raj Manocha: Methodify, so we’re about five years old. Now we’re around 60 people when it comes to staff. And we’ve just been on a tear. Weren’t the first in by any means. Lots of great companies out there. The Quantilopes, the Zappis, the Momentives, all these companies. Qualtrics is all focusing on that type of stuff. The difference for us is we’re trying to play more operating system, connector. So there’s a lot of stuff that’s closed looped, we want to be more open looped and connect to everybody and to everything. So if you have 10 different platforms, someone’s going to play connector. Someone’s got to be that sort of windows for this industry. You’re not going to have 10 sign ons to 10 things. Well we have a lot of products and we originally went down this path of marketplace. Very much like a Zappi. We learned as we went, that wasn’t the play. And if we were going to do products they have to be interesting and innovative. They can’t just be concept tests or value props. It’s got to be stuff like AI, machine learning, like what’s the next big thing? And on top of that, people have this view of what their insights hub. They’re, where they log in, in the morning and then where they log up at night. We don’t have a CRM in our industry for a lot of reasons. Like a Salesforce or QuickBooks, someone’s got to play that role. That’s what we really want to do.

[00:03:59]

Jamin Brazil: I love that and I’m completely aligned with you on the thesis. Who’s your ideal customer?

[00:04:04]

Raj Manocha: Our ideal customer is someone who is, well I’ll give two different things. Our ideal customer is actually sometimes not even the insights professional. The marketer for a couple of reasons. One, a lot of times they control the money. And they’re not looking- What sometimes we get stuck in our own way, we’re looking for a perfect sort of thing. Sometimes it’s about being close enough. And agile has kind of shown this way. Marketers have less of a time worrying about that, versus the insights professional. But we have some really future forward insights professionals over the last two years who have really bought into what we want to do. So we look for that medium sort of size company. We love the large guys too, but it’s a lot of red tape to sort of go through everything. But the medium ones are the ones who can quickly react to vision. Change the way they want to do things, adjust their stuff, manage change management really well. That’s ideal for us.

[00:04:52]

Jamin Brazil: That makes a lot of sense. So you’re a little bit like customer type agnostic and more about like their speed to, sort of the agileness, is that it?

[00:05:01]

Raj Manocha: Yes. If we were ever doing a customer journey mapping, we’re not looking for the most valuable insights group in the world. We’re looking for folks who can do the right things, change management, have a vision for research, want to create change, have their team believing in it, but also that their internal stakeholders have bought into this as well.

[00:05:20]

Jamin Brazil: Totally. That makes that makes a lot of sense. I have so many questions about that in terms of, because it is more purpose built or purpose- Funny the second time I’m saying that which I haven’t said it at all in this conference so far. But identifying those people from a sales perspective would seem like a potential challenge.

[00:05:36]

Raj Manocha: It is and it’s been difficult. I think Canada was a bit of an easier play across the board for a lot of reasons. The companies just aren’t as large and even the big ones are not as big as global ones. US what we found is more if you think about like the Russell 2000 index. It’s those small cap kind of companies who might not have a massive insights group or maybe the marker is the one running the research. So we’ve identified more companies in that space than we have anywhere else.

[00:06:01]

Jamin Brazil: Well congratulations on your remarkable success over the pandemic period.

[00:06:03]

Raj Manocha: Thank you.

[00:06:04]

Jamin Brazil: Thinking about the lessons learned and kind of the state of the industry coming out of the pandemic, what is a trend that you see carrying us into 2022?

[00:06:14]

Raj Manocha: The biggest thing I’ve seen is the amount of appetite for change. And what by that is, some have been forced but others have just really started to buy into what’s around them. Even if you look at this conference, in the old days I would have seen all the traditionals sponsoring. Now it’s a lot of the nontraditional as well, the tech companies are here.

[00:06:31]

Jamin Brazil: There is no- You have maybe like Murray Hill. But you look around the room and I’m like I don’t know you.

[00:06:39]

Raj Manocha: And other than Ipsos, the big guys really aren’t here. But it’s all tech, people are buying. And what’s interesting is people are buying multiple technologies. They’re not just buying one thing, they’re buying a bunch of things. So the big trend I’m seeing is someone’s got to figure out how to play connector. We are ripe right now. There’s about 1200 research technology companies in space. Almost $18.5 billion globally. Now most of that’s driven by Qualtrics and Momentive, but you’re starting to see a trend 30% growth in the category for research tech over versus 10% of the category in general. So you’re seeing propensity here right? And you can probably infer most corporate clients are buying more than one type of thing. Transcription or automation or whatever. So someone’s going to have to help them stage that across.

[00:07:20]

Jamin Brazil: Do you see that, then your business like from a strategic perspective and this might be a question that we have to not answer on the podcast. But it feels like from a strategic perspective there’s a huge roll up opportunity for you. Because you have a view in terms of what customers like from an add on platform perspective. Like maybe emoji surveys is like something interesting or maybe a survey that leverage video. Do you know what I mean? Like whatever.

[00:07:46]

Raj Manocha: And what we- We call them boosters. So we think of quant or qual, let’s call that a platform in itself. You want boosters along with that. Everything we- Everything around us can be platforms. Our phones, this conference, it’s you’re finding things around right? Surveys for a long time were in a construct in which this would be how we operate, straight line. Yes, basically 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Now, it’s more choice based. It’s what do we want to add on to get the right opinions from people? And so if we’re going to create better experiences for the respondent, including qual, quant, whatever this tech is. Someone’s got to stitch it all together. And that’s how you get really, really slick and scale. And so for a lot of our companies, it’s or the kind of corporate clients we work with, it’s not about just implementation, but it’s the change management over time, what that vision looks like over three years. So it’s become much more strategic. And for a lot of reasons the industry has not moved that way because we buy in an ad hoc fashion. We buy about the project we see in front of us. And sometimes that’s budget related. Sometimes it’s just we don’t have the resources to manage it. But you’re seeing more strategic buys now into bigger things.

[00:08:44]

Jamin Brazil: And that was, and it’s interesting you used the example of like closed looped versus open. And because I think that’s exactly right. And Forsta now was FocusVision. One of the challenges I experienced there was, we were a closed loop framework, which then you have to do innovation categorically. Which was like eating an elephant. Pardon the expression. It’s very, very hard and it’s not just one elephant, it’s lots of different elephants. And so like the R&D, the focus, all that kind of stuff can really have a lot of challenges. At least when I was there in managing that kind of thing. Whereas your framework is one where because it’s open, I can plug in the, whatever the trending survey platform is today or whatever the qual-

[00:09:28]

Raj Manocha: And a lot of that’s come from companies like Uber because you’ve created this Uberfication of our lives where we want what we want the way we want it. So as a company now you want to create the loop you want to have, maybe you don’t want the video stuff we have, you want somebody else’s. We have to be OK with that. As an industry if we’re trying to become better and get, we always talk about a seat at the table, forget that you want to control the whole entire thing. If you want to do that, run the thing you want to run. Don’t get stuck in the paradigm we’ve created in the past. That’s the big change we’re seeing. That people are starting to think about vision much more frantically to kind of catch up either to their peers or they know they’re going to be in trouble if they don’t. So they want to create systems that make sense for their companies.

[00:10:05]

Jamin Brazil: Perfect. Exciting, really exciting stuff. Well congratulations on your success, look forward to hearing from you again.

[00:10:12]

Raj Manocha: Absolutely, thanks for the invite.

[00:10:15]

Jamin Brazil: Everybody have a great rest of your day.

Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 435 – CRC 2021 Highlights: Mike DeGagne, Vice President of Sales at Quantilope

Welcome to the CRC 2021 Highlights Series. Recorded live in Dallas, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors, speakers and attendees at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Mike DeGagne, Vice President of Sales at Quantilope.

More about CRC 2021: https://www.insightsassociation.org/conference/crc-2021 

Find Mike Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaeldegagne/ 

Website: https://www.quantilope.com/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Live CRC. Gosh, I don’t even know how many of these I’ve done. But this is an honor to have Quantilope with me. I’ve got Mike DeGagne, VP. Quantilope is the name of the business. They actually started out in Germany and now have a global presence. Mike, welcome to the podcast.

[00:00:16]

Mike DeGagne: Thanks for having me. It’s my second time.

[00:00:18]

Jamin Brazil: I know. Now, the first time was a long-form interview that we did.

[00:00:21]

Mike DeGagne: I think it was, yeah.

[00:00:23]

Jamin Brazil: And pre-pandemic, is that right?

[00:00:25]

Mike DeGagne: Yes. It was my first month on the job so I didn’t know anything. But I hopefully sounded like I did.

[00:00:32]

Jamin Brazil: Well, a lot has transpired since that particular moment and time. Let’s talk a little bit about Quantilope. Tell us about the business.

[00:00:39]

Mike DeGagne: So I think it was three years ago when we did the initial one. I was the first US hire. Now, we have about 70 people in the US. We’ve grown considerably. I have 40 people on my team. We are hiring like crazy for sales, consulting, research, office administration. The whole deal for New York. We’ve grown out of our capabilities. We started out as a Quant solution for automation. We automated all these point solutions for doing research for the survey system, the data cleaning, waiting, fielding, visualization, stats package. Now, we’ve recently acquired and built on top a qual solution, video qual solution. We are combining qual and quant together. We are trying to overcome the insights dilemma.

[00:01:20]

Jamin Brazil: The qual solution that you’ve bolted on is asynchronous, correct?

[00:01:26]

Mike DeGagne: Correct.

[00:01:27]

Jamin Brazil: Got it. Some of the competitors like Voxpopme comes to mind. Any other companies that you like seeing that framework?

[00:01:34]

Mike DeGagne: I mean it’s usually a needs case. We are not going to be like a company that competes for in-home ethnography or online focus groups. For some people, this is going to feel like a video qual solution. And for others, this is a new question type for quant. What they haven’t been able to do.

[00:01:50]

Jamin Brazil: That’s kind of the interesting thing about it. Quant, we all understand I mean it’s euphemism for survey. But qual all over sudden, opens up this well, what are you exactly? I appreciate that clarity. I really see video qual or asynchronous qual as a material growth opportunity. Because eventually we will be doing qual at scale. As I said many times, a survey is literally just a conversation at scale. Video of course being the way that we have conversations in many cases now. Being able to be able to take that data in a video format, and then being able to analyze it and subsequently report on it is pretty important.

[00:02:35]

Mike DeGagne: For us, the way we think about overlaying qual is with quant, we get a tremendous amount of what data and how data. What do they do, and how much do they do, and how often they do it. But with the qual data, when you bring it together on a unified platform you can quickly and seamlessly actually go ahead and get the why. That’s what’s missing with quant. It’s all how’s and what’s but not the why.

[00:02:59]

Jamin Brazil: That’s good. And definitely as we heard today from a number of speakers, one of the things that quant does a great job is generate the underpinnings of the validation of the point of view. Thinking about like the scientific method. But what qual does a really good job of is humanizing that data and turning it into a real story that is repeatable around the virtual water cooler.

[00:03:24]

Mike DeGagne: That is true. That is very true. We are finding that one of the challenges as well in the world that we are living in with GDPR and California legislation. Companies also can have six or seven different data processing agreements. Six or seven different companies storing their data. Seven different salespeople. There is now a need to consolidate to platforms that are able to do much more at the same quality.

[00:03:46]

Jamin Brazil: Interesting. We are in-person again, finally. How is that going for you?

[00:03:52]

Mike DeGagne: It’s going well. I live in Brooklyn with my lovely fiancée and my little dog, Marlin. In Brooklyn, we never really had a moment. Although things changed with restaurants and wearing masks. There has always just been people around. But it is weird to get on a plane. It is weird to be in a hotel. It is weird to remember that I have favorite restaurants at the New York International airport.

[00:04:15]

Jamin Brazil: There is definitely like as a fellow traveler. You definitely get this accustomed experience of like I can’t wait to eat at that place or that. You know what I mean? It is not a second home but there is cheers element to different places that we stop and frequent. That’s hilarious. You spoke today at CRC. What was your topic?

[00:04:37]

Mike DeGagne: It’s the idea of humanizing insights but with the focus on driving impact. A lot of what our jobs as insights professionals has become is moving data around. And building and following processes about data collection, data methodologies, data visualization. But we don’t focus on the impact to the data until we actually have the PowerPoint. These horrible PowerPoints slides. Then we try to find three data points to justify the $100,000 we just paid the full service agency for. We need to flip the script there. We need to focus and start the conversation on impact. We have a framework called the impact assessment framework that we introduced here that looks at start with the why, collecting qual and quant data. Getting real with ourselves about leveraging technology and stop making excuses in special cases and caveats on why technology won’t work for your organization. It was very full organization. I’m sorry. Very full room with a lot of really good questions.

[00:05:40]

Jamin Brazil: That’s awesome. Do you have a favorite speaker aside yourself?

[00:05:46]

Mike DeGagne: Yes. But he’s on our board now. When we launched the, we call it inColor, the new qual solution. He was with me on the line so I stole some of his little narratives and stories. He didn’t join mine which is good because I straight up stole some of his stuff. Ripped some of it.

[00:06:02]

Jamin Brazil: Perfect. 2022 is around the corner. What do you see is the trend that’s developed in the last 12 to 18 months that will carry us forward into 2022?

[00:06:12]

Mike DeGagne: People are sick of the word agile because it means nothing. This is my hot take.

[00:06:18]

Jamin Brazil: Now let’s pause really quick because agile has meant something historically.

[00:06:22]

Mike DeGagne: Yes. For me, agile jumped a shark when we saw sample providers that are still doing research and still providing the same services as 15 years ago now touting agile. Agile isn’t just talking about doing something faster or a word that’s on a booth which we look around and we actually will see that word in a lot of places. It’s actually meaning that it’s an approach that takes things like speed and substance but doesn’t sacrifice quality. It’s just kind of like a word like value. We throw around the word value way too much in sales and in client relationships. That’s my hot take that I think that people are already getting fatigued and will move beyond. Even the vendors will move beyond agile.

[00:07:02]

Jamin Brazil: As a word? As a term?

[00:07:04]

Mike DeGagne: As our industry. It’s a paradigm shift of 15 years ago. Everybody was talking about paradigm shifts. Nobody uses that phrase anymore.

[00:07:10]

Jamin Brazil: Or blockchain maybe five years ago.

[00:07:14]

Mike DeGagne: Well, I don’t even know what that is today still. But just kidding. I do. I like to tell people blockchain, startup, investor funding, coins, ICO’s. It’s the same thing.

[00:07:22]

Jamin Brazil: Exactly. That’s super interesting. You see a vernacular change. But when you think about the substance of what we deliver and how we deliver it, what do you see as a trend?

[00:07:31]

Mike DeGagne: I’m hoping, and this is a hope. This was the big kind of controversial thing I guess you’d call it is that I challenge everybody to take a look at how they are doing research and not the platforms they are using. But all of the caveats and those little exceptions that they are making and they don’t know why. A lot of researchers are changing their ability to actually work with different partners because of well, we’d like eight attributes instead of six. We know the industry is used to doing it this way with this waiting. But somebody built this waiting things five years ago and we have to use it. We need to look at what is style, versus what is truly function. What do we just like to have versus what is needed to have great research in the organization. I think when we actually look at that and challenge those things, most of the things that we hold as the most important re just style.

[00:08:21]

Jamin Brazil: Do you have a specific example?

[00:08:23]

Mike DeGagne: It’s a lot to do with waiting, piping, logic. When you start to go into some of these relationships and historical data, and you are like why is this so complex? Why is this a 45-minute looping study for the people? It’s like well, we’ve been doing it 15 years and some guy named Alan. If you can’t explain in under 15 seconds to a lay person why this has to be this way, then it should be challenged.

[00:08:45]

Jamin Brazil: Interesting. I totally agree with you in terms of the sacred cows that we have in the industry. I recently responded to somebody on LinkedIn who asked a question about why do we still ask industry questions relative to market research and then terminate them? Especially in the context of market research being more commonly part and parcel with everybody’s job description. There is definitely this just we’ve always done it this way and that’s why we are just going to keep doing it.

[00:09:13]

Mike DeGagne: I don’t work in market research. I work in technology so I can get into the survey. We are slipperiest group out there. We know what the rules are. I think we just need to challenge a lot of the assumptions that are causing us not to adopt the things that will lead to better impact.

[00:09:28]

Jamin Brazil: Mike, thanks for joining me on the podcast.

[00:09:29]

Mike DeGagne: That’s it? You don’t want me to sing, dance?

[00:09:33]

Jamin Brazil: Next time.

[00:09:33]

Mike DeGagne: I will throw out, and we did this last time. If any brand is out there and is interested in trying out either the qual, quant, or combination. We do a free pilot for brands so include samples. We’ll see you guys soon.

[00:09:43]

Jamin Brazil: Got it. Where do you get your sample?

[00:09:45]

Mike DeGagne: Everywhere and anywhere. We are panel agnostic. We believe that every question and every research need, you need to actually go and weigh the pros and cons. Gen pop, thoracic surgeons in Malibu. One company cannot own the perfect panel. We use great partnerships with Dynata, DISCO are two of my favorites. I really love the people at both those companies.

[00:10:06]

Jamin Brazil: Are using exchanges as well?

[00:10:07]

Mike DeGagne: We are in some cases and we have something that’s coming out really soon that I can’t comment on. But something is coming with the fun acronym APIS and things like that.

[00:10:17]

Jamin Brazil: Sounds like an exchange. The challenge of course is we’ve black boxed through the exchanges, as we black boxed the participant experience really and sourcing. We’ve seen a tremendous influx of bots. Of course, my listeners are so sick of me hearing. But you know what? Fuck it. This is really important point that we are missing I believe in favor of cheaper CPIs. So, it will be interesting to see what solutions you provide to that as we thing about moving into an election year of 2020 to where I mean there should be an increase of about 20% of participant engagement. We are already looking at a 30, 40% fraud rate in open exchanges. All over sudden, you’ve got a real concern around where are the ballots of the people coming from. Anyway.

[00:11:05]

Mike DeGagne: I think the thing is any partner, if that is a concern for you, and it should be especially in the election grouping. You should want to talk to this company center of excellence. They should be able to answer that question and answer it really concisely. Unfortunately, I lead the go to market in the US. But we have a guy named Troy who’s amazing, and he has a lot of experience. His job is exactly that. If you have questions or if you want to talk to him, we can make an intro.

[00:11:30]

Jamin Brazil: Thanks for joining me.

[00:11:31]

Mike DeGagne: Thank you.

Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 434 – CRC 2021 Highlights: Edward Staples, Senior Director of Business Development at Prodege

Welcome to the CRC 2021 Highlights Series. Recorded live in Dallas, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors, speakers and attendees at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Edward Staples, Senior Director of Business Development at Prodege.

More about CRC 2021: https://www.insightsassociation.org/conference/crc-2021 

Find Edward Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/edwardstaples/ 

Website: https://www.prodege.com/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Hey everyone. I’m with Edward Staples, senior director of Client Success at Prodege. Of course, I could probably pitch Prodege as well as anybody, but I’m going to let him do that. Tell us a little bit about the business.

[00:00:12]

Edward Staples: Thanks, Jamin. I appreciate the opportunity to do so. You could probably do at least as good a job as I could, but I’ll give you what I like to tell to clients and I do it with excitement because I’m a genuine believer in the Prodege brand. I guess if we’re known for anything it’s that we have the largest proprietary panel of consumers in the industry. You’ve got 120 million people within the Prodege ecosystem that are available for survey taking, we also have behavioral data on them. So we’re a great way to connect with the right consumers. More than anything, that’s what we’re known for. And we also do a number of other operational support things for our clients. So we program and hosts surveys, we consult on those. We do translations, we do this all over the globe, delivery of data, delivery of data visualization. So soup to nuts, stem to stern support, but always it starts with those consumers that we can get people in touch with.

[00:01:17]

Jamin Brazil: And the consumer is really the asset. Fraud rates have never been higher, especially on the open exchanges. 35 to 40% is the current amount, which is creating this environment of oversampling is kind of the new normal. Which, listen I’m- this is- I’m not in a hurry to try and put [INAUDIBLE sounds like: cast aside] – but I’m just saying categorically, this is sort of the issue that we’re dealing with. How are you guys dealing with fraud prevention?

[00:01:39]

Edward Staples: I love that question. I have a theory that if somebody says great question, it’s because you’re asking the question they wanted you to ask, because it plays to a strength.

[00:01:46]

Jamin Brazil: I do that. By the way, this is not a sales pitch. I genuinely care about the answer to the question.

[00:01:50]

Edward Staples: Totally, this wasn’t a setup. But it’s a good question and it’s very important to us because we are a proprietary panel and there’s not a ton of those that are still left. And we feel like this matters a lot to the quality of the respondent and therefore of the data, and therefore of the business recommendation you’re going to make your end client. At the end of the day, I’m not going to design a multimillion dollar Super Bowl commercial based on the answers from a thousand bots that are coming in from some survey farm. And I think Jamin, you’re referring to this year, especially there’s been an influx of these fake respondents, some bots, some actual human beings pretending to be Sally from the Midwest and John from the East coast or what have you. There’s some things we’ve been doing all along that are important to keeping fraud rates down. We have the tools that you would hope a company would have in place, double opt in verification, identity verification, mobile device verification, those kind of things. We work with Imperium. So all the boxes are checked off. One of the important things is our respondents can’t touch a client survey for weeks and I won’t say how many weeks, because that’s sort of the secret sauce, but for weeks, until we’ve gone through a lot of surveys that test their quality, that weed people out.

[00:03:16]

Jamin Brazil: So you have a vetting in place?

[00:03:17]

Edward Staples: Yes. Exactly.

[00:03:19]

Jamin Brazil: Super interesting. Cross referencing. That’s an interesting solution to the problem. That would be hard for a bot to kind of cross reference.

[00:03:25]

Edward Staples: And it allows us to build up those profiles on people while we’re doing that. So it’s sort of a winning.

[00:03:31]

Jamin Brazil: More expensive on-boarding right?

[00:03:33]

Edward Staples: Yes.

[00:03:34]

Jamin Brazil: Because I assume there’s some little bit incentivization for participants?

[00:03:36]

Edward Staples: Yes. That’s true. If people are answering surveys, they’re earning points in our panel currency and it’s true, it’s a more expensive way of maintaining things, as well as throughout the tenure of their relationship, we’re testing their qualities. We’re listening to our clients to see how are the open-end quality, what- is anybody straight lining, that sort of thing. On the other hand though, I think one of the things I like about Prodege is there’s so many ways that we engage our members. So they sign up and they can take surveys, but they’re also doing a lot of the things they were organically doing online anyway and engaging with our brand. So for instance, they- I did all my Christmas shopping last year online, me and everybody else, and all of the companies that I bought from were partners to Prodege. So Walmart and Target and eBay and Amazon and Sephora, but I could literally name you 1,000 other brands and I get points back, because I shopped online with those companies. But I could do other things, like if I’ve got a fully charged cell phone, maybe I’m playing a game, maybe I’m watching a video, maybe I’m trying a product, maybe I’m- what have you, these are other ways in which I’m getting points. So we have a very engaged membership. They stay with us for a very long time. We literally have people that have been on our panel for over a decade, which blows my mind.

[00:04:58]

Jamin Brazil: And that is an interesting unique point, because panel churn is particularly high right now. And that’s largely, I think a function of the botification. They get caught, they get out?

[00:05:10]

Edward Staples: Right, exactly.

[00:05:10]

Jamin Brazil: And also poor engagement- or poor incentive. It’s almost like a comp- participants, real humans they actually care about-. There’s only a certain amount of reasons why you participate in surveys and let’s be honest, like TikTok is a million times more fun than any survey you’re going to feed me. There’s way better ways for me to entertain myself. So you either care about the category, which in most managed panels, the participant isn’t exposed to the category, because that would create some initial bias of sampling. And then another reason is you care about the incentive and we’re doing as a general- the CPIs are so low right now, ridiculously low. You can’t imagine very much money is actually going to the individual.

[00:05:54]

Edward Staples: It’s not a way to make a living for sure. And you’ll get requests from people that want high investible assets, super high income and are they available online, maybe, but are they going to talk to you for 15 minutes for 50 cents, definitely not. That doesn’t get you there.

[00:06:15]

Jamin Brazil: So this is an interesting point where I think buyers just need to wake up. The- now you don’t need to agree with anything I’m going to say, because it’s maybe controversial, but it’s such that we think-. So a high end motor company, automotive company, they wanted to hire us to do some recruiting for some interviews. And it was like $200 recruit fee, not in the incentive, just the recruit fee. And they’re like, gosh, that seems like a lot of money. I know they said, whatever the IRR is, etc. And I’m like, I got to recruit these people in a digital context and they’re thinking about buying an X- spending a hundred plus thousand dollars on an automobile in the next three months. So for that recruit, I got to compete with all of your competitors and you for their time and attention. And how much are you going to spend on getting in front of them for 30 minutes. And they’re like, we’re going to spend, well, exactly.

[00:07:14]

Edward Staples: It’s important to understand that. And it’s the sort of- it’s the compliment to what our clients are doing. So I know that my clients are being very careful to keep that consumer hat on. So if my client’s watching an advertisement, they’re looking at it in the same way they would if they didn’t work in the industry. And trying to understand, does this motivate me, do I remember the brand, that sort of thing. So in the panel world, I’m trying to think, why would I take the survey, would I take this survey. Would I- how am I going to feel if I spend 10 minutes and then I get disqualified out of the survey, things like that.

[00:07:50]

Jamin Brazil: I love that. Super [CROSSTALK] humanization of it.

[00:07:52]

Edward Staples: Important to quality, but proprietary is important, I think just because I like to use this little analogy. So do you want to talk to somebody who we’ve quality screened and profiled for years and we know a lot about their behavioral data, we’ve got receipts. Or do you want somebody who’s in the middle of an online poker game and they need 50 points to get to the next hand. And would you like to take a survey and which type of medicine do you practice, is the first question they get.

[00:08:22]

Jamin Brazil: All of them.

[00:08:23]

Edward Staples: Or a brain surgery. How hard could it be.

[00:08:28]

Jamin Brazil: Just, everybody you just need to pause for a second and think about what he just said, because it’s the predominant way that recruiting is done and is through paywalls. And paywalls are- this is a really good example of like, there’s an interruption to something that I’m doing right now online and I want to continue to do that thing. I need that pig for my Farmville or whatever and now I’ve got- I’m forced to help that application or platform monetize me. And so surveys are- have become a natural way for that monetization experience to take place. So that is the framework of the participant. Now, what’s interesting about that participant is they might actually go through that thinking right about your poker game example. They might actually go through two or three surveys before they qualify, so they can actually get into the poker game again. So their motivation is not around an incentive or a value. Their motivation is to get to the next hand in poker. And that really- we just have to be honest with the sample sourcing of the industry right now. And there’s hundreds of companies that that is their sole point of origin of participants.

[00:09:40]

Edward Staples: 100%, I couldn’t agree more. It’s like you’re reading my own marketing materials, so 100%.

[00:09:47]

Jamin Brazil: That’s a big problem. We’re going to move on. We’re in-person here in Dallas. How’s that going for you?

[00:09:52]

Edward Staples: I love it. So I’m in a business development role and it’s not just talking the talk, the best part of what I do is get in front of people and meeting them and having face to face conversations. Zoom has been a nice, I don’t know, an appetizer if you will, but it’s not the same. So it’s great, and it’s been interesting to me because, so I went to The Quirks Event in Chicago and that was like masks on from the second you went into the venue, they never came off. You- it was like being at a conference of super villains. Like, I don’t really know your identity, but I can see your eyes.

[00:10:31]

Jamin Brazil: I would have said heroes, but that’s fine. Either way.

[00:10:35]

Edward Staples: Maybe I’m revealing a little bit about myself. But here in Texas, it’s masked off, I’d say 95%. So that’s interesting.

[00:10:46]

Jamin Brazil: It’s mask optional.

[00:10:49]

Edward Staples: Which in a lot of settings means no masks or very few. I’m fine with however people want to do it. If I feel like I want to wear a mask, I’ll just wear a mask. What’s important, I think is that we’re not just individuals, we’re social creatures. We’re meant to be circulating in groups of people. So I think it’s great. I’m very glad that my industry is so supportive of the idea of trying to get us back together again.

[00:11:18]

Jamin Brazil: We’re definitely a human industry representing humans to humans, which is a fun place for us to be able to sit. A lot has changed in 2020 and 21. What do you see post pandemic as a trend that’ll carry us into 2022?

[00:11:33]

Edward Staples: I’ll skip over the soft ball answer being, Zoom and that kind of way of contacting people. Bravo, Zoom, glad I had stock in you before this all started.

[00:11:46]

Jamin Brazil: Congratulations.

[00:11:48]

Edward Staples: It’s a rare win for me in that market. But what I see happening in the industry are- is a couple of things that are important. The growth of behavioral data as a method of targeting and it is certainly an area in which Prodege is in investing very heavily. We’ve got an awesome team that’s building up our receipt capture data, our clickstream data, our geo-fencing for geolocation data, plus all of the other things that I mentioned, ways in which we engage our membership, create data points for us. The ability for us to say, hey, I know you’ve got a client in there, whoever, you name it, P&G Johnson & Johnson, whatever. I can find you people who I can validate have purchased a- their product or in their category or their competitor or whatnot. People go bananas for that and clients I’ve heard love that. So it’s exciting to me. That’s one thing. And then the other thing is the evolution of DIY tools. Back in the day, there were a lot of tools and they’d be, here’s your cost for licensing the tool and how many members you have, because we got to charge you for how many people sit there and lah-de-dah, but that’s not acceptable anymore. I think table stakes right now is to have a powerhouse DIY tool and not just here’s your license, good luck. It’s got to have that backend support. And of course I’m playing to our strength too a bit here as well, we have our own DIY tool that allows people the ability to, I just want to get sample, or I want to get sample, I want to program a survey or I want to do those and I want to have data visualization, that kind of thing. I’m here with my colleague Kelly Kitchens, who’s helping drive the development of this product. And one of the things I’m excited about at Prodege is- I’ve been in the industry for, I don’t know, 16 years. And I’ve worked for companies that have had product development attempts and then the following year, you’re like, I’m not selling that anymore, or we’re not supporting that anymore.

[00:13:59]

Jamin Brazil: Part of the problem is, developing really good product is hard and it’s usually like, software companies are software companies and sample companies are sample companies. It’s like a DNA difference with how they’re- how that happens. It’s rare that you see a company that’s on the sampling slash services side that’s able to actually make that- close that gap and become a software company.

[00:14:20]

Edward Staples: 100% and vice versa. I’ve seen companies that have said like, we have a panel of X million people, and I’m like, you mean you’ve had X million people download your app. And they’re like, why what’s the difference. And I think an advantage is that our headquarters, our mothership, if you will, is in Los Angeles. So you throw a paper airplane, you’re going to hit a software developer, so that doesn’t hurt. But the team that’s been working on developing that and I think a little bit of the magic is that the tool that we’re offering to our clients is the same tool we’re using in-house.

[00:14:54]

Jamin Brazil: That helps.

[00:14:55]

Edward Staples: It gets a lot of attention, as you can imagine. So it sounds like I’m drinking the Kool-Aid, but I I’ve been so excited to be here. But you can’t succeed if you don’t believe in it. I can tell that you have that same, that excitement, your eyes light up when you’re talking about what you’re doing. And same here, you can see it in somebody’s eyes if they’re just reading the script. But I’ve been here for a little over three years at Prodege and-.

[00:15:23]

Jamin Brazil: So you see really software as a- or maybe automation, DIY as a trend, that’ll move through 2022?

[00:15:31]

Edward Staples: Yeah. My clients are being challenged with the idea of, hey, you’ve got to be scrappy and you can’t spend too much money, but we’re going to give you more work because we can’t backfill an employee. So now what do you do if you’re that researcher.

[00:15:45]

Jamin Brazil: More DIY.

[00:15:46]

Edward Staples: Yeah. More DIY and more options and knowing that you have support.

[00:15:50]

Jamin Brazil: Ed Staples, Prodege, MR thank you for joining me on the Happy Market Research Podcast.

[00:15:55]

Edward Staples: Thanks for having me. I appreciate it.

Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 433 – CRC 2021 Highlights: Christina Corbett, Contract Recruiter at Suzy

Welcome to the CRC 2021 Highlights Series. Recorded live in Dallas, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors, speakers and attendees at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Christina Corbett, Contract Recruiter at Suzy.

More about CRC 2021: https://www.insightsassociation.org/conference/crc-2021 

Find Christina Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/charismatichristina/ 

Website: https://suzy.com/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Live at CRC. We are the Happy Market Research Podcast. Christina Corbett. Did I say it right?

[00:00:05]

Christina Corbett: Hello. You did.

[00:00:07]

Jamin Brazil: Recruiter at Suzy.

[00:00:08]

Christina Corbett: Yes.

[00:00:08]

Jamin Brazil: Suzy has been blowing up.

[00:00:11]

Christina Corbett: Blowing up. Thank you. I’m going to take some credit for that.

[00:00:14]

Jamin Brazil: You should because really a company’s value I believe is largely a sum of the value of the employees.

[00:00:23]

Christina Corbett: Yes.

[00:00:23]

Jamin Brazil: So you’re fulfilling a very important role by recruiting and retaining top talent.

[00:00:28]

Christina Corbett: Yes.

[00:00:28]

Jamin Brazil: But before we get into that tell me a little bit about Suzy.

[00:00:31]

Christina Corbett: So Suzy is your one-stop shop for all research. Our platform handles both qualitative and quantitative research all in one fell swoop so you don’t have to go for any outside products, any outside data. It is all found in our platform. It’s a quick turnaround. You get the best insights and your presentations are made directly in our platform so you don’t even have to go to PowerPoint if you don’t want to.

[00:00:52]

Jamin Brazil: Really cool.

[00:00:53]

Christina Corbett: Very cool.

[00:00:54]

Jamin Brazil: Love that. Of course you guys have had venture backed I believe, right. I’ve seen quite a few rounds of funding.

[00:00:59]

Christina Corbett: Yes, we are in our Series D funding, which we earned in July, $50 million. So we are so excited. You would have thought we were all getting $50 million but when someone explained to me I was still very excited; maybe a little less but still very excited.

[00:01:14]

Jamin Brazil: That’s hilarious. So we are in person.

[00:01:15]

Christina Corbett: Yes.

[00:01:15]

Jamin Brazil: This is one of the first in-person events post-pandemic. How is it for you getting back to?

[00:01:23]

Christina Corbett: You know it is strange because for a while there I was like I don’t know if this will ever be possible again so I’m very happy that it is. Waking up, you know more than 30 minutes before my first meeting was difficult but it was nice. I’m excited to actually see people fully, see people’s shoes and like see people walking around. I’m here with some of my coworkers who I’m meeting for the first time and like it is bizarre to see how tall people are in real life. So it’s great.

[00:01:51]

Jamin Brazil: The height thing is interesting, isn’t it?

[00:01:53]

Christina Corbett: It is. It changes the perspective a lot. I’m sad that people know that I’m short now but it’s fantastic.

[00:01:59]

Jamin Brazil: Me too.

[00:02:01]

Christina Corbett: No.

[00:02:02]

Jamin Brazil: We should start a support club.

[00:02:04]

Christina Corbett: Short-port. No, I like that better, short support. There you go. Yeah. You know, innovative.

[00:02:10]

Jamin Brazil: So a lot of disruption in our space. You’ve been a beneficiary of a lot of the disruption.

[00:02:15]

Christina Corbett: I have.

[00:02:17]

Jamin Brazil: What do you see as a material trend carrying us out of the pandemic into 2022?

[00:02:21]

Christina Corbett: You know I think that people now have a lot more value in themselves, which I think is – you know 2020, we will never paint over how just terrible and life-changing it was. But I think that the time we had to actually pause and think about what matters to us translated very well of course to our personal lives, but especially to our professional lives. We know what we deserve. We know what we’re worthy of. And I just don’t think there’s any coming back from that in a good way. So I’m glad that we are where we are now and I hope that that continues as we you know get back to normal, whatever that means now.

[00:02:55]

Jamin Brazil: I love that view that you’re taking on really the improvement to the human psyche of self-awareness and internal value.

[00:03:03]

Christina Corbett: Yes.

[00:03:04]

Jamin Brazil: As opposed to external. What do you attribute that to?

[00:03:07]

Christina Corbett: Honestly, just the slowdown. We didn’t have time before to sit back and think about if we were happy. We just – we did what we were supposed and that’s what’s supposed to make us happy but when we had a chance to pause and think about it, a lot of us realized that we weren’t. And I’m glad that we did. So now we have a chance to figure out what happiness looks like, what it feels like, and how we can translate that into our professional lives.

[00:03:28]

Jamin Brazil: Love that point of view. It’s exactly correct. One of the things that I think happened during the pandemic was an increase in network.

[00:03:37]

Christina Corbett: Yeah, oh yeah.

[00:03:38]

Jamin Brazil: People became more like both in terms of number of connections and then also in terms of the depth of the connections.

[00:03:43]

Christina Corbett: Yes.

[00:03:43]

Jamin Brazil: Right, the depth of the connection because for the first time we were able to see people in their natural environment, kids running around lighting the house on fire, right?

[00:03:53]

Christina Corbett: Yes.

[00:03:53]

Jamin Brazil: Cats jumping on keyboards.

[00:03:54]

Christina Corbett: Dogs protecting us from mailmen too much.

[00:03:59]

Jamin Brazil: From the Amazon guy.

[00:04:01]

Christina Corbett: Oh my goodness, every day.

[00:04:05]

Jamin Brazil: How do you think that’s going to impact our like connectivity as we move – human connection as we move into next year?

[00:04:13]

Christina Corbett: I think it’s going to continue to get deeper. Again, I think there’s a lot more purpose behind what we do now so when we make a connection, I think there’s a new drive to understand people at, you know if it’s a professional link, fine, but we want to see them as people. And I think that it’s healthy we keep that conversation alive of how was the pandemic for you. What did you learn, what did you experience because then we get deeper than you know I added new connections. I made this sale. It’s I got closer to my children, I got into puzzles, which I did. So I think that it all just changed how we view people beyond what their LinkedIn says they are.

[00:04:46]

Jamin Brazil: Christina Corbett, recruiter, Suzy.com. Check them out.

[00:04:50]

Christina Corbett: Yes, please do.

[00:04:52]

Jamin Brazil: It’s an honor having you on the podcast.

[00:04:52]

Christina Corbett: Thank you so much for having me.

Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 432 – CRC 2021 Highlights: Bryant Leech, Vice President, Agile Insights & Platform Solutions at InnovateMR

Welcome to the CRC 2021 Highlights Series. Recorded live in Dallas, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors, speakers and attendees at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Bryant Leech, Vice President, Agile Insights & Platform Solutions at InnovateMR. 

More about CRC 2021: https://www.insightsassociation.org/conference/crc-2021 

Find Bryant Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bryant-leech-1822a0b/ 

Website: https://www.innovatemr.com/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Hey everybody. Thanks so much for tuning into the Happy Market Research Podcast. I am Jamin live today at CRC in Dallas, Texas. I have with me right now Bryant Leech, Innovate MR. He is the VP of agile insights and platform solutions. Sir, welcome back to the podcast.

[00:00:18]

Bryant Leech: Yeah, this is my second time on it.

[00:00:20]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, we’re in person though for the first time, you and I together.

[00:00:22]

Bryant Leech: That’s true. Yes. This is the first time we’ve actually met. It’s great.

[00:00:25]

Jamin Brazil: It’s kind of cool.

[00:00:26]

Bryant Leech: Great to meet you.

[00:00:28]

Jamin Brazil: For sure. So tell me – I mean Innovate MR has been all over the place. You guys have had a thriving success through the pandemic. Tell me about the business.

[00:00:38]

Bryant Leech: Yeah, so I was doing managed services before with Nielsen for quite a while. I just saw the trend kind of moving towards you know sort of quick, faster sort of solutions. And we had been using – at Nielsen we were using Innovate MR quite a bit for their panel solutions. And I just saw that there was quite a big trend, more and more proposals we were sending out were getting beat by faster players in the space. And so I just kind of found that this was maybe a perfect place for me. They were developing sort of a – it’s kind of a faux pas in the industry right now, a DIY solution, so quick, fast survey solution on top of their panel platform. It was already kind of what we saw as being very quality. And so that’s why I ended up joining with them. They do a lot of – so they’re originally a panel company working on quality panelists and then building onto that sort of a DIY solution. So it’s been great.

[00:01:34]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, I read about the DIY solution. I also read about your new CEO.

[00:01:38]

Bryant Leech: Yes, we are very excited about Lisa joining us as our new CEO – not joining us but getting promoted to CEO. So yeah, she’s great. I pull her into way too many conversations than she probably deserves to be.

[00:01:50]

Jamin Brazil: Or needs to be.

[00:01:51]

Bryant Leech: Yes, exactly.

[00:01:52]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, for sure. She’s a powerhouse in the industry and I got to be honest. I think that was a genius move joining one of the few female CEOs in the space.

[00:02:01]

Bryant Leech: Absolutely.

[00:02:02]

Jamin Brazil: Congratulations. Well, what do you think – I know it’s early in the show but what do you think about getting back to in-person meetings?

[00:02:08]

Bryant Leech: It feels great to be back with everybody. You know I think it’s good to see faces again rather than just small little LinkedIn profiles or on the screen with their crazy backgrounds and things like that, right over these last 18 months.

[00:02:22]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, for sure. Do you have any specific expectations with the show?

[00:02:27]

Bryant Leech: You know I don’t know exactly. I’m very excited for barbeques and beers tomorrow.

[00:02:33]

Jamin Brazil: That’s going to be awesome.

[00:02:34]

Bryant Leech: So that’s the main one I’d say.

[00:02:36]

Jamin Brazil: I think that’s sponsored by C&B.

[00:02:39]

Bryant Leech: Yeah, I never had Texas barbeque. I’ve always missed it when I’ve ever been down here so very excited for that.

[00:02:44]

Jamin Brazil: That’s awesome. I am too. OK, well last question. Tell me. A lot has changed, like everything has changed in the last 12 months or 18 months. What do you see as a trend moving into 2022?

[00:02:56]

Bryant Leech: Yeah, you know I think you know it’s a big reason why I kind of switched things up. And one of the first slides that they put up there was how fast some of these agile solutions are changing, the industry, you know 35 percent growth year over year is crazy to see in some of these solutions. So I think that’s going to be a big trend and it’s going to be a big trend around how can you give them that DIY solution but that also allows you to still have some human aspect to it. And that’s I think going to be a really big trend moving forward is how can we both work together from both clients and suppliers in a more succinct manner.

[00:03:37]

Jamin Brazil: Bryant Leech, VP, agile insights and platform software. Innovate MR is the company. Thank you sir for joining me on the podcast.

[00:03:44]

Bryant Leech: Thanks a lot.

Happy MR Podcast Podcast Series

Ep. 431 – CRC 2021 Highlights: Ben Kappes, Account Executive at Focus Groups of America

Welcome to the CRC 2021 Highlights Series. Recorded live in Dallas, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors, speakers and attendees at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Ben Kappes, Account Executive at Focus Groups of America. 

More about CRC 2021: https://www.insightsassociation.org/conference/crc-2021 

Find Ben Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/benkappesfga/  

Website: https://focusgroupsofamerica.com/ 

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 

Music: 

“Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com 


[00:00:00]

Jamin Brazil: Hey everybody. I’m Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast live at CRC in Dallas, Texas. Ben Kappes – nailed it – account executive, Focus Groups of America is the name of the company. Ben, thank you so much for joining me on the Happy Market Research Podcast.

[00:00:18]

Ben Kappes: Thank you for having me on.

[00:00:19]

Jamin Brazil: All right, so here we are live in person. Tell me a little bit about your business.

[00:00:24]

Ben Kappes: Well I guess in short FGA is a full-service research supplier and we partner with market research teams and consultants by providing them with a turnkey solution or ala carte services to support their research.

[00:00:37]

Jamin Brazil: Got it. Give me an example.

[00:00:39]

Ben Kappes: Our main services are things like recruiting and videography, but we do a lot of facilitation services as well, whether it’s online or in person at a facility.

[00:00:48]

Jamin Brazil: Well given that you guys were predominately it sounds like in-person business pre-pandemic, the pandemic would have impacted you pretty dramatically. What do you think about getting back in person? How is that impacting you?

[00:00:59]

Ben Kappes: It’s pretty great to be back to in person. I mean the pandemic was certainly interesting. We took a pretty dramatic shift. I guess pre-pandemic the majority of our work, I’d say like 90 percent was in person. But throughout the pandemic we’ve been seeing nothing but online research, which I’m sure most people in the industry have been as well. But it’s certainly interesting getting back into in person but really I’m kind of indifferent one way or the other.

[00:01:28]

Jamin Brazil: Almost agnostic in terms of online, digital, just methodologies now.

[00:01:34]

Ben Kappes: Yeah, I mean in person is certainly fun. It’s nice to get out of the office. But I mean online research certainly has its benefits as a lot of people have found over the last years.

[00:01:44]

Jamin Brazil: What do you see as a trend coming out of the pandemic that’ll carry us into 2022?

[00:01:49]

Ben Kappes: I really – I’ve seen a lot of people that are planning on continuing to go with online methodologies. They find it to be cheaper, more convenient both for them and their clients. And really it just works better for them. So they’re more than happy to tune into a Zoom call and you know gather their insights in that way.

[00:02:08]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, so you’re seeing Zoom as like one of the platforms that people are turning to for online qual?

[00:02:12]

Ben Kappes: Yeah, a lot of people are using Zoom. I know there’s a few different you know platforms available. We actually offer our own. But ours is actually built off of Zoom. We found it to be the most robust platform and really the platform that let us tailor it for market research the best.

[00:02:30]

Jamin Brazil: Yeah, for sure. Zoom’s – we use Zoom as well and it’s been – it is just like amazing, the quality, the consistency, not to disparage any other platforms but like Zoom’s definitely industrial strength.

[00:02:42]

Ben Kappes: Yeah, it’s a great product and we’re happy to be a part of it.

[00:02:45]

Jamin Brazil: It does lack the back room experience, doesn’t it?

[00:02:47]

Ben Kappes: It does but it’s funny you mention that. We’ve actually found a work-around for that entirely. We’ve managed to create a virtual observation room within our Zoom calls and that’s really what separates our platform from a standard Zoom package.

[00:03:01]

Jamin Brazil: That’s super-cool. Are you leveraging its go live functionality or YouTube?

[00:03:07]

Ben Kappes: We’re not using a native broadcasting channel but we are using an integrated broadcast channel to securely stream that out.

[00:03:14]

Jamin Brazil: Got it. And then clients would – your customers would have access through some sort of like private key or password-protected.

[00:03:20]

Ben Kappes: Yeah. Typically for our platform we send them like – it’s essentially another Zoom call and then we broadcast the Zoom call into that Zoom call through a third-party integration.

[00:03:31]

Jamin Brazil: My guest today has been Ben Kappes, account executive, Focus Groups of America. Ben, it has been an honor having you on the podcast.

[00:03:36]

Ben Kappes: Thank you so much for having me. It’s been an honor to be on.

[00:03:40]

Jamin Brazil: Everybody, have a good rest of your day.