CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Travis Miller – PureSpectrum

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Travis Miller, VP of Client Success at PureSpectrum.

Find Travis Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/travismiller09

Email: travis@purespectrum.com

Website: purespectrum.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

Hi, this is Jamin. You are listening to Happy Market Research Podcast. I am here at the illustrious… Actually, I don’t even know the name of the hotel. Travis, what’s the name of the hotel?

[00:40]

It’s the Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Florida.

[00:43]

There you go. We are at CRC, which is the client or customer. Always forget what the first C stands for.

[00:49]

Corporate Researchers Conference.

[00:50]

Yep. Corporate Research and associated with the Insights Association, which is actually been one of my personal favorite shows. I’ve thought this quality of the speakers overall has been pretty good, has been good, not pretty good. Did you listen to Google this morning?

[01:06]

I did not get a chance to see Google this morning.

[01:08]

You missed out. So, what happens: (I just found this out), you can listen to the episodes on their app. So, make sure you download the app before you leave and then if you want to listen to it—which I definitely know you want to listen to cause I know you’re a thought leader—then you can pick up the key sessions that you wish you could have made, but you couldn’t because you drank too much tonight before.

[01:30]

There’s so many of the sessions here.

[01:31]

So many sessions here. So PureSpectrum is the name of the company. Travis Miller is the dude I’m talking to. How are you today?

[01:42]

Doing great.

[01:43]

Okay, good. So, tell me a little bit about PureSpectrum. Give everybody the background.

[01:46]

So PureSpectrum, we are a sample management platform. A do-it-yourself tool, API-integrated marketplace, whatever you might call it. But it’s a place for people to come in and buy online sample. We’re kind of like the expedia.com for sample providers. You can come in, set your sample criteria. You can choose from a number of different sample providers, see their pricing and feasibility and make a determination and launch your project.

[02:11]

We’ve been using PureSpectrum, FYI. And I will say one of the things that I really like about it is the ease of use of the gooey or the user interface. It’s like super easy to use, and it’s like sample on tap, which is great from a research ops perspective.

[02:29]

That’s one of the biggest compliments that I get from current customers and prospective customers when I show them the platform. They can’t believe how easy it is to use. When they do get to use it, we have a team of people that can help answer questions and help out on projects. So, it’s not just do-it-yourself, but it frees up a lot of time for a lot of researchers to get to what they need to do. And that’s the research, the analytics.

[02:50]

So, the show you’ve been walking around. You guys don’t have a booth here. What’s your take? What’s your takeaway? What are highlights?

[03:00]

Well, I think highlights of some of the sessions I have attended and I’ve heard a lot about the technology. I’ve heard a lot about different platforms and how that’s being applied in research, which is very exciting. I’m walking the floor. There’s a lot of great exhibitors here. It seems like there’s a good buzz around this conference. I wouldn’t say it’s the big conference; it’s not the small conference. But it’s that conference where you get to know everybody. The networking opportunities have been great. I feel like I’ve been talking straight for a day and a half and meeting with everybody. It’s been great.

[03:30]

So, there’s always this tension between do I get a booth or do I not get a booth cause it’s expensive, whatever, five some odd thousand dollars. Or do I just get a pass and attend? I think you can’t do every conference. Walking around here, (This is recorded) do you feel like it’s beneficial to have the booth or do you think you’re better off on this one to pass on the booth?

[03:58]

That’s a good question. Jamin. I’ve been walking around; obviously I don’t have a booth. I think for your business…

[04:03]

And a lot of people, a lot of people by the way have been walking around without having a booth, and I’ve done that and do that a lot. So, I’m not casting stones saying that’s a bad choice. I’m just wondering like, ‘cause your sales not marketing. And I’m wondering from that lens if you’re like, “Gosh, you know what? If we had a booth…” I’m not judging the ROI. I’m just saying if we had a booth, we would get more leads. Or is it, “I’m hitting capacity as a sales guy by just commingling”?

[04:33]

I don’t know what advice to give to that one.

[04:37]

I thought it would be interesting from that lens. I mean, so for us we’ve gotten about…new company, HubUx. I don’t know exactly, about 30 leads, quality leads, so far. And the booth provides that opportunity for people to be able to go meet at a spot and we’ve done it. But most of the homework that we did was like pre-bookings to demos to the booth, which, of course, helps quite a bit, especially ‘cause we’re not paying big premiums. You can see where our booth’s located right in the back by the bar, just perfect. So anyway, I think that it’s interesting. I won’t pick on other people, but there’s some people that are just flying in; they don’t even have conference registration, but they’ll just like hang out in the hallways and, literally…

[05:28]

I’m a fan of support the conference you’re at. Register. Of course, you want to support: I support Insights Association.

[05:36]

Well, you guys are members.

[05:37]

Members. I support Southern California, Northwest, Southwest.

[05:40]

You do your holiday party actually… You sponsor their party with your holiday party.

[05:46]

Of course.

[05:47]

Yeah, right. Yeah, of course. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. I get it. And so, it’s always that tension I find like, ‘cause nobody can afford to get a booth at every conference. So, you always have that tension of like, okay, “Is this one? Is it that one, is it this one?” I’ve been trying to hone it in like what is the right fit? If I only had five conferences, I could afford to put a booth at next year, three maybe, what are those conferences in North America alone? Not thinking about at an international level.

[06:14]

I think you have to look at the theme of the conference. For PureSpectrum, I think we’re a technology company, market research company. We’ll, I’m sure, be represented very well at IIeX again next year technology conference.

[06:25]

So, Austin, IIeX.

[06:27]

For sure, we’ll have a booth there. The Quirks Events tend to be great. We may consider CRC for next year. I think for us it’s what type of takeaways and what type of users are we getting. Who’s going to be there? And does it make sense for us to have a full booth where we can give demonstrations or can we have quick introductions and people that we’ve been talking to for six months through the summer to have some face to face time? So, for us, I think we’re here attending. It’s a great event. We’re shaking a lot of hands, meeting a lot of people. If we had a booth, maybe we’d have a little bit more, but at the same time, maybe it’s not the right fit. So, there’s other conferences that…

[07:05]

It’s a really interesting question and I do it, of course, both ways. So, don’t hear what I’m not saying. I’m just really curious like, “Gosh. It’s tough. It’s tough ‘cause you can’t go to everything. It’s just too much of an overhead and too expensive. It’s too much.” But there it does feel like this fear of missing out, FOMO, when you’re there, but you don’t have the…

[07:28]

It can be.

[07:29]

It can be.

[07:30]

Even think of the people who attend. Which conferences do you even attend?

[07:33]

I know there’s so many of them. It’s mind boggling!

[07:36]

And some of them have different budgets, different researchers. I think every conference as much as they have the same idea, they are all a little bit different.

[07:44]

Yeah, totally. But you don’t want to be talking to the same people over and over again. That’s the other challenge, anyway. So, if somebody wants to get in contact with you, how would they do it?

[07:53]

Reach out to Travis@purespectrum.com. You can also check out our new website at purespectrum.com. And feel free to reach out, learn a little bit more about what we do. Jamin can be a really good reference for us; he does use us and we appreciate the business.

[08:10]

Yeah, 100%. Yeah, of course, you’re very welcome. Travis, it’s been an honor having you on the podcast. Thanks. Enjoy the rest of the show. Let’s get a cocktail.

[08:15]

Thanks, Jamin.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Susan Griffith – Readex Research

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Susan Griffith, Ad Effectiveness Sales Manager at Readex Research.

Find Susan Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/susangriffithsalesandfitness

Email: sgriffith@readexresearch.com

Website: www.readexresearch.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to Happy Market Research Podcast. The show floor is being torn down. Exhibitors are packing up, looking forward to just getting to their cats, dogs, kids, whatevers. It’s going to be a pretty good time, and I have the pleasure of having Susan Griffith with Readex Research as my guest. How are you today?

[00:51]

I am terrific. Thank you for asking.

[00:53]

Tell me about Readex and that’s R E A D E X.

[00:57]

Correct. We are a company based out of beautiful Stillwater, Minnesota, which is just north of St. Paul. Our specialty is online and mail survey research, self-administered studies, which nobody’s prompting. Its participants are taking the survey sort of at their leisure. It’s timed but at their leisure. So, been in business since 1947, long before me. But I am a legacy employee. Back in the day the company was started by an ad agency executive and they were trying to determine…

[01:35]

I mean that’s like early days of research.

[01:37]

Exactly, whether ads were being read and impactful. So back in the day print, there are still mail surveys done this way but the survey is sent out with a copy of the publication and people put their remarks on it. It’s sent back to Readex. But my mom (getting back to my legacy), she was one of the housewives that would go to Readex, pick up a stack of magazines, bring them home, and in our basement, she would compile and organize the scoring of what happened. So, that was back in the day.

[02:10]

Love it, all manual process.

[02:11]

Exactly. In the basement. So fast forward to now, I would say about 75% of our business is online, but we still do a lot of mail surveys, which is why we are here.

[02:25]

National Research Corporation is a company that does patient satisfaction, and the government has required that a certain proportion of patient satisfaction still be done through mail. Why? Because there is a portion of the population that is not online, which is really interesting. And it’s almost like it’s the other way now, where we’re all in on online and digital. And I can’t think of the last time somebody has done a paper survey.

[02:54]

Exactly. Well, think about even your mailbox at home or at work; we tend to get less mail. So now, the mail survey isn’t part of a huge stack of ads and things you don’t need. It is not unique, but it isn’t in a big stack anymore. And you’re right. I think about industries where there’s an aging population. I think about remote populations. And then we do some work in human resources, employee satisfaction surveys. And one of the niches about that is the confidentiality factor. So, lots of DIY tools, I won’t mention the name, are not confidential.

[03:38]

That’s right, totally.

[03:39]

So, you go to a manufacturing plant where a large percentage of the employees are in a factory without email addresses. So that’s another place that people choose mail over online.

[03:53]

So interesting, isn’t it?

[03:54]

Plus, response rates are usually better.

[03:56]

Is that right?

[03:57]

That is true.

[03:58]

Do you do the $2 in the envelope thing?

[04:00]

It’s a dollar for most. Back in the day, it was a penny, but yes, inflation or otherwise, a dollar is really kind of the mainstream. However, in some tougher markets, I would say we have a few customers that will put in $10 checks, and I say tougher markets, I’m thinking physicians.

[04:21]

Still a very inexpensive cost per interview.

[04:24]

Yep, exactly.

[04:26]

What kind of response rates do you get with paper?

[04:29]

Paper? I would say it runs the gamut. There are factors that influence it. Longer questionnaires, you have to be mindful of response fatigue. So, a standard 20-question survey, 35% to 55%, especially if you’re asking questions that are really engaging the person taking it. Here’s an example: When we work with associations and they are being asked about member benefits and why are they here and what’s been important to their membership, those are high responding audiences because you’re asking them for their opinions, which could impact decisions that the organization makes.

[05:09]

Yeah, the response rate thing I think is really… It’d be fun to do an A-B test with online and paper just to see what the IR would be because my hunch is that there… You’re seeing IR continue to plummet online. So, now maybe it’s time to put the other shoe on the foot. Kind of fun. What kind of costs? What is the cost Delta there? How does that look?

[05:38]

Well, methodology, email versus mail; email is typically cheaper. We know we’re just swapping electrons. Determining factors would be the length of the questionnaire and how much data we’re going to be asking. Even formatting questions, structured questions require a check and this, and open ends require some transcription, potentially comment coding. But then on the back end, the deliverables: You just want an Excel file that’s pretty reasonable. But if you want us to put together a pretty presentation. “Ready. Here you go. Here’s your results.” Cost there, too.

[06:13]

If somebody wants to get in contact with you, Susan, how would they do that?

[06:16]

Very easily by phone (651) 439-8066 or email SGriffith@readexresearch.com.

[06:26]

Give us the phone number one more time.

[06:28]

(651) 439-8066.

[06:32]

And, of course, that will be in the show notes. What do you think about the show?

[06:35]

Love it. You know, I haven’t had a lot of in terms of volume conversations, but good quality ones. That’s what you come for.

[06:44]

Yeah, exactly. The ROI on these kinds of things is pretty straightforward, right? You get one customer and you’ve probably paid for the show.

[06:50]

Exactly. Plus, it’s just nice to be seen in the space that you’re good at and you’re involved in.

[06:58]

Absolutely. I totally agree with that point. That’s like exactly right. Well, it’s an honor having you on the podcast. Thanks so much. Everybody else, have a great rest of your day. I am signing out.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Philamena Dougherty – Virtual Incentives

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Philamena Dougherty, Director of Strategic Accounts at Virtual Incentives.

Find Philamena Online:

Email: pdougherty@virtualIncentives.com

Website: www.virtualincentives.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

My guest is Philamena Dougherty, Virtual Incentives. I’ve used Virtual Incentives for most of my career actually. For instance, in fulfillment. How are you?

[00:42]

I’m great. I’m great. I’m really happy to be here.

[00:46]

We are onsite at the drinking hour for Insights Association’s CRC event. You guys have a booth precariously located by the podcast.

[00:57]

Yes, we did that on purpose. We did do that on purpose actually. We really wanted to meet you.

[01:06]

You did not.

[01:08]

We did, yes.

[01:09]

I don’t believe you, but I appreciate it.

[01:11]

We actually wanted to learn more about HubUx.

[01:13]

Oh, my gosh, okay. This is not about me. This is about you. All right. So, we’ll definitely talk about that off air. So, it’s exciting to see the energy here on the floor all of a sudden. This is kind of neat.

[01:29]

It is, especially for me in my position. So, I have a lot of partners and a lot of clients here. So, just to see worlds colliding like this, it’s one of my favorite things about MR and this conference, in general.

[01:42]

It’s interesting in Virtual Incentives, which is, of course, an incentive fulfillment platform that you can both automate as well as bulk upload.

[01:50]

Sure, so when I say partners, I mean like our partners are survey software platform partners who are involved with our integrations. So that would be the automated process: the incentives directly in survey.

[02:07]

Maybe you should give us the elevator pitch or describe what it is that you guys do for the audience. I obviously know, but…

[02:15]

Okay, as far as market research is concerned, we incentivize respondents and community members. So, it helps build engagement with panels and helps build complete rates, keeps people involved in surveys and, really helps get valid reliable data and respondents into the surveys and completing the surveys.

[02:40]

Yeah, for sure. It gets to the motivation factor of the respondents. So that one of the nice things about it is you can tailor the incentive around.

[02:50]

And it kind of seems to me like it’s almost a forgotten, crucial last step.

[02:55]

Totally.

[02:56]

You don’t always hear about incentives when you’re talking about market research, but it really makes a difference in certain cases when you’re looking at trying to increase response rates or hit harder to reach quotas.

[03:09]

It’s interesting you say that and I actually remember there was this period of three-ish years where there was a bunch of analysis, research-on-research or R on R on how to motivate respondents. And it was like comparing different incentive levels: guaranteed versus sweepstakes versus abstract things versus knowledge sharing versus…

[03:35]

…point systems…

[03:36]

Yeah, exactly. But then there’s been this like ten-year period where there hasn’t been any research that I’ve seen anyway that’s been like professionalized and distributed. It feels like there’s a good opportunity there.

[03:50]

Definitely. And we’re seeing people start to do this now, market researchers with our integrations. You can have the same group of people going through a survey with an incentive at the end of the survey or none. And you can just use that control group to sort of look at the response rate…

[04:07]

So, you can A-B test the… That’s super interesting.

[04:09]

…within the same survey, within the same group of respondents to really look at how it’s affecting or not even how it’s affecting, but like what denoms are going to push people to complete a survey. Do you really need to offer them 10 or is 5 okay, too? So, there’s definitely a lot of focus on incentives in market research and… So, we’re just really happy to be here.

[04:37]

That’s awesome. I’m happy to be here, too. Somebody just handed me a beer, which is exciting. That’s never happened. We have two days left in the conference. Today is kind of set up, more like bonus day.

[04:50]

Today was mostly for the corporate researchers. So, there are a lot of sessions designated for corporate researchers.

[04:58]

So, it’s going to be a good event. I hope you have a great time.

[05:01]

Sounds great. Thank you so much.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Naira Musallam – SightX

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Naira Musallam, Co-Founder of SightX.

Find Naira Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/naira-musallam-36385592

Website: sightx.io

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

Hi, this is Jamin. You are listening to Happy Market Research Podcast. My guest today is Naira Musallam PhD and co-founder of SightX, one of my absolute favorite companies in the industry right now. Welcome to the Happy Market Research Podcast.

[00:47]

Thank you for having me and thanks for the shout-out.

[00:50]

Yeah, of course. Well, thanks for creating technology that is adding a ton of value to the market research space. Tell us a little bit about SightX.

[00:58]

Yes, So, SightX came about to solve for the problem that many in this space experience, and that is one for the fragmentation. The idea that you have to rely on multiple tools to be able to go from collection to cleaning, to formatting, to restructuring, to uploading into another platform. We thought we can do a little bit better by streamlining the process one. So, it is a technology that fits for the needs of 2019 and to also solve for the issue of expertise. The world that we live in really expect everybody nowadays in the space to be experts in what they’re doing, to get it right, to get it deep, to get it fast with the massive amount of data. And so, how do you do that? Like how do you deliver better, faster, deeper with outdated technology? So, we said we’re going to just develop a technology that enables people to deliver on these expectations.

[02:28]

I think that there’s a couple of points that I’ve separated out, right? One is the disparate number of tools that are required in order to do a research project. On a qualitative basis, there’s approximately six to eight tools that are used just to recruit people. It’s really funny… Between Excel. Anyway, that’s a different topic. But my point is that… Well, Stacey Walker, Head of Insights for Adobe told me, ”I’m sick of all the tools. I don’t want to hear about another new tool,” which is really interesting, right?

So, the ability to be able to consolidate your work into a single platform means that you’re getting consistent data structures, consistent ways of interacting with that data, analyzing that data. It should create a tremendous amount of velocity improvement.

[03:19]

Yeah, I fully agree and sympathize with the sentiment of not wanting to see one more tool. Look, I always tell people nowadays we have so many options, right? It’s more about how are you experiencing it and how are you getting there. So, to even take it out of market research, I say you want to go from New York to California. Do you want to ride on a bus or do you want to take a helicopter that is waiting outside of your home, right? Like for me, these are like the analogies, like these are the tradeoffs and these are like the solutions, quite frankly, that we have to continuously and think about. How do we do better? How do we make it a better experience? How do we get people there faster without compromising? And that’s really, really important without compromising on the depth.

[04:32]

So, you have a PhD. What’s a PhD in?

[04:34]

Statistics and psychology.

[04:36]

Okay. That’s like the perfect intersection for consumer insights, isn’t it?

[04:41]

You can argue so, you can argue so. I think about what we’re doing. I actually think in our lifetime, we’re going to see a revolution in education. I don’t think it’s going to… like PhDs don’t scale. It’s a great degree I’ve got, and if anything, I would say like the value out of it was setting me up to be open to learn and learn fast and figure it out. Now, I don’t think we would have the model of doing that for five to seven years. I think is going to change. I think is going to change, and I don’t think it scales. So, the more we can scale expertise and PhDs, I think like this is where we succeed as a society.

[05:35]

I love that. I think that’s so powerful. And you’re right that like while the PhD or the educational component doesn’t necessarily scale, the application of the knowledge and then into technology that does scale, which is, I think, one of the things I really like about SightX. So, on a practical basis, the type of projects that you’re doing are quantitative, right? So, it’s survey-based. Can you give us an example of what a soup-to-nuts project looks like? Like what would a user use you for?

[06:09]

Yes, our users tend to be from different industries, CPG, media and entertainment and everything tech, everything in between and the type of projects they run could, for example, they range obviously and it could be around trying to understand their consumer segment them, right? And this is what typically SightX enables them to do. So, you collect the data and let’s say you have 30 questions, and now you’re going to start segmenting. So, the users can go the traditional way of saying, “I want to segment this demographic group. I would like to add this age group and then see what the results look like.” And they user is able to do that with a few clicks. And so, you’re taking process that could take hours or days and you’re bringing it down to 30 seconds. And then, the user can start experimenting with this area of unsupervised learning. So, without having to have a PhD in statistics, what they could do is then click on this button that says, “Run segmentation for me that is not based on any assumptions of how I should segment the audience.” And what happens is actually pretty cool because now you’ll have accessibility. You have the time and accessibility to do it. Then the user clicks on this one button says, “Segment without any assumptions.” And what happens is one of two things. Sometimes the unsupervised segmentation aligns with the segments that the business leader intuitively thought of. And sometimes you end up with completely different personas. And that opens up like awesome conversation among consumer insights team to say, “Okay, how come we ended up with a little bit of different segmentation we didn’t think about?”

[08:22]

And so, I’ve done a little bit of segmentation work, and I call it one part – art, two parts – science. So, you’re always moving things around a little bit because what this histogram or however it is that you’re getting there, but it’s really helping you do is frame the discussion for who the persona is, right? And so, by your platform identifying set of optimal statistical tools to segment or come up with your segments, that’s really powerful. But then how are your users leveraging that if they don’t have the statistical knowledge? Is the information displayed in a way that a non-statistician would be able to understand and process and interact with?

[09:17]

Exactly. We built the tool in such a way that somebody who doesn’t have any background in statistics or analytics can actually understand it. And this was something really important for us to do and invest in: making sure that whatever we do on the platform is, doesn’t matter how complex the analytics part of it, is accessible to whoever is using it.

[09:49]

Are you in that process saying, “Okay, I want a five-factor solution”? Or you know what I mean? Is that six, three, that kind of thing?

[09:57]

Yes. We even adjusted the language. And so, factor, typically statisticians start associating it: are we doing latent analysis? Factor analysis? What are we doing here? And we even wanted to adjust the language in the sense to say, “Just speak personas.” And so, that user who’s there actually says, “I would like to create five personas. I would like to create seven personas. I would like to create three personas.” And then, it runs the unsupervised learning and creates them.

[10:36]

All right. So, last thing on a personal note: You are a mountain climber.

[10:41]

I am.

[10:42]

And you climb mountains. What is your favorite mountain climbing story?

[10:47]

My favorite mountain story is probably with my co-founder, Tim Lawton. And so, before starting our company, we went to climb Denali together. The first time, we were a part of a group, and we didn’t make it to the summit. We came down and then decided to go back up two weeks later and climb it again. And on the mountain, a lot of stories took place, but probably one of my favorite during that climb was when we were deciding on a summit day, whether we’re going to push to the summit or not because of weather conditions. And so, Tim and I have all of these conversations around whether we should play it by ear. Do we collect the data live? Or do we make a decision prior to that and then decide to push? So, we have like this debate, and we need to decide what is going to be the turning point. And I was more on the side of let’s just like watch and see what happens. But funny enough, we decided there was going to be a window. We go on the mountain and then there is a blizzard. And so, we decide it’s bad. So, we need to turn… Denali is not happening for us, I guess. And so, we started going down the mountain for three hours, and suddenly there was sun. And so, we stop and Tim goes—the guy who’s all about making decision prior—and says, “I think we should wait and watch what happens, and then decide if we were going back up.”

Long story short, we go back up, decide to turn back, and an eight-hour climb ended up being for us 21-hour climb because on the way we also had an accident. And so, it was a tough day, but we made it to the summit. I share that as one of my favorite story because it was failing and failing and failing and failing and debating and arguing. Different personalities bring in different points of view. But at the end of the day, it made us… The reason we made the summit because we were so different in our approaches to it.

[13:42]

I love that. And you’re right, yin and yang. And then if that exists in a spirit of cooperation and respect, then you’re able to actually find a more complete point of view or truth on what you should do. So, congratulations on finding a very good co-founder.

[13:58]

He’s the great, fantastic co-founder.

[14:01]

Great story. Oh, so, if someone wants to get in contact with you?

[14:04]

If somebody wants to contact me, they can either email me at Naira@SightX.io, or they can just reach us on our website: go to SightX.io, and there’s contact button there and that way they can get in touch.

[14:25]

Perfect. And, of course, we’ll include that information in the show notes. Thank you so much for your time today. Enjoy the rest of the show.

[14:29]

Thank you for having me, Jamin.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Mike Sawicz – Market Logic Software

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Mike Sawicz, Account Executive at Market Logic Software

Find Mike Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/sawicz

Email: msa@marketlogicsoftware.com

Website: www.marketlogicsoftware.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. We are live today at CRC here in Orlando, Insights Association. Mike Sawicz, Market Logic Software is the name of the company. Mike, thanks so much for sitting down with me for a few minutes.

[00:46]

Oh, thank you for having me.

[00:47]

So, the show is in the third and final day. Break has just happened. So, the floor is starting to fill up; so, I won’t keep you too long, but I do have a couple of questions for you. Tell me, what do you think about the show?

[01:00]

It’s great. We’ve had a really good time here. I met tons of interesting people on both the client side and my research colleague side. Excellent conversations, really rich presentations. I’ve learned quite a bit. We’re seeing a lot about how AI is coming into play and how the technology in this space is really emerging and changing. But also, lots of great topics on storytelling and crafting insights for larger stakeholder audiences to really help them manage and run their business.

[01:41]

Yeah, I feel like there’s a tremendous number of client-side researchers here, right? I’ve been meeting a lot.

[01:49]

Yeah. This is certainly not vendor fest.

[01:52]

Yeah. That’s kind of a nice change.

[01:53]

It’s very nice.

[01:55]

Yeah, for sure. I think you gave a talk, didn’t you?

[01:58]

I did. We had a little chat about how our platform enables both AI and HI (Human Insights and Intelligence) to come together to help our customers create a very powerful asset base.

[02:16]

Okay, I love that asset base being the insights or the decision framework to make…

[02:22]

So, at Market Logic, we build insight platforms where at an ingestion layer our customers upload and take in all of their primary, secondary, syndicated, and structured data that can come in along with news feeds from the outside. So, in one source, you have all the information that you need to craft those stories about your customer base and the delivery mechanisms. So, when we talk about storytelling, we’re a little more on the telling side. So, our system has feeds, and it really is designed to push information to those key stakeholder bases. So, all that expert knowledge that our colleagues here are creating can be put into knowledge zone. So that’s the HI part. You craft that story; you have access to all the information; you can build it with videos and infographics—really compelling way of telling that story— and then have that pushed out to your stakeholders automatically. You don’t have to rely on emails; you don’t have to rely on roadshows. It’s available 24 hours a day. There’s a Q&A area in there so that expert can stay in touch with your stakeholder base. Stakeholder can subscribe to it, or the AI in the system based upon their role and what they’ve searched for and where they’re located will push that information. So, for our researcher community, they love to go to the information. So, having that broad base is super important. But for the stakeholders, they don’t always want to go. They need and we as an organization need to push that information. So, information goes to users.

[04:11]

Yeah, it’s much more of a push relationship, right? People don’t click or open, but if it’s in my inbox, I’ll read it, right?

[04:17]

If it’s in my inbox or it pops up on my phone in a news feed, then, “Yeah.”

[04:22]

That’s really interesting. So, you’re handling multiple, disparate data sources, types (structured, unstructured), not a lot of meta descriptive around some of them. Then you’re obviously applying AI in order to understand, process, etc. those feeds. I’m really interested in the origin story. Like you’re literally eating the elephant ‘cause not only that’s hard but then on the other side of it, you’ve got data or insights, accessibility and visibility, which is a really important leg of the stool. And then the third leg of the stool is the production of the insight and distribution of the insight, which again, is like a material kind of a lift. So, where did you guys start? What was your first bite?

[05:14]

I love your “How do you eat an elephant?” Well, one bite at a time. So, our first bite was around primary research. So, going back, the company’s about 11 years old, and it started with this kernel of knowledge that researchers get these “What do we know about” questions all the time. And it takes up a lot of their time. So, we built our system on understanding unstructured data in the primary realm, and being able to really, instead of just pointing you to documents, pulling out findings, standalone reusable pieces of information that had been thoughtfully extracted from your research. At the time it was done by humans; today that auto summarization is now done by the machine. But back 11 years ago, even a few years ago, that was really still not possible. So, our chops were built in primary and then as we grew and expanded, we moved into secondary.

So, we now have a technology layer that connects users to their subscription data while respecting their commercial relationship. So, we partnered with hundreds of different sources to index their content. So, you said, “Hey, you know, getting the metadata.” Well, we index everything that these secondary source providers have, and they let us share that, knowing that we respect the commercial relationship. So, when users click, they’ll see the article when they click on it; if they have access to great, they go in; If they don’t, they’re given a little message that says, speak to so-and-so about how you could have access to this. So, for the secondary source provider, we’re just a doorway into their system. For the client side, you don’t have to go to five sources now; you go to one place. And then we moved into bringing in RSS feeds and creating the ability for users to curate their news stories and edit news channels. So, now you can bring in RSS feeds; you have secondary sources; you’ve got primary.

[07:30]

So, you really built the platform first, it sounds like, for your own business at an execution level and then it became usable by the market. Is that right?

[07:44]

Well, we are purpose-built for insight. So, it is really about making insights the center point and the focal point of the business. So, our tagline is running insights-driven business. That’s always been the case.

[07:59]

Got it. I guess my point is that it sounds like you guys are researchers and, in that framework, you’ve built tools that enable you to do stuff that’s important, get to your core, or put insights at the core and the customer in the center. And in that framework, of course, the technology has built out over time as the world has evolved, which is to your origin story, which I really like. You can’t do everything at once, but as you said, as you expand and then the world… And it’s almost fortuitous that you were able to start when you did because it was early in social; it wasn’t playing as important of a role. Anyway, if somebody wants to get in contact with you, how would they do that?

[08:45]

Go to MarketLogicSoftware.com and look at our webpage. Look me up.

[08:52]

Cool. And I’ll include your contact information in the show notes. Mike, it’s a pleasure. Mike Sawicz, excuse me. I’m going to impose your face on Randy, and we’ll see how the macho man looks. So, anyway, it was a pleasure having you on the Happy Market Research Podcast. Thanks, man.

[09:07]

Oh, thank you.

[09:08]

Everybody else, have a great rest of your day. As always, screen capture, share a five-star review. I love you. Have a great day!

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Matt Lucas – GutCheck

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Matt Lucas, Senior Manager of Product Management at GutCheck.

Find Matt Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/matthew-lucas-73b2951a

Website: www.gutcheckit.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

I’m here with Matt Lucas, Head of Product for GutCheck. It’s actually one of my favorite companies right now.

[00:38]

Well, that’s very kind of you.

[00:40]

You guys’ve been around a long time.

[00:42]

About nine years, I believe.

[00:44]

Yep, that’s right. So, how long have you been part of the company?

[00:47]

I’ve been with the company for almost four years.

[00:49]

Okay, got it. So, Head of Product is actually one of the highest sought-after jobs, right? It is a very prestigious… There’s a lot of people that would like that kind of a role. Tell our audience what that job actually entails.

[1:04]

My role at GutCheck oversees a couple of different things. We focus on our technology development. So, our product team works with our engineering group to productize our research methodologies. I also work closely with the research science group to take client feedback or market feedback and turn that into new research methodologies to meet needs out in the market.

[01:27]

You guys, it’s nine years old?

[01:30]

Nine years. I’ve been there about four.

[01:32]

You’ve been there four. Okay. What is the thing that you’re the proudest of?

[01:35]

I think today the thing that I’m proudest of is the way GutCheck… I’d say that GutCheck was on the leading edge of agile market research, and we generally had applied that to quick-turn to mean fast and cost effective. But I think where the industry is heading today and where GutCheck is heading as well, is bringing that agility upstream to support foundational research to build the competitive edge with audience intelligence. I think it’s really critical that we bring the same level of agility that we brought to the tactical market research—creative testing, concept testing all the way back up to audience understanding— to deliver that in a way that can keep up with today’s marketing and product innovation cycles.

[02:17]

So, when you think about the current state of sample are you guys API-based? Is that whole process automated or…?

[02:26]

We have a few different techniques, somewhat automated. Rather than focus on specifically integrating with one partner, we have relationships set up with a variety of different partners. So not necessarily panel-based, but our reach is pretty broad to allow us to get to the standard consumer all the way down to specific B2B audiences. My favorite example is not everybody can reach Russian dermatologists, but we’ll try to for you.

[02:56]

So, I think that’s on point. The opportunity of reaching anybody is real right now through social and then also through just like being crafty.

[03:08]

Yeah, definitely, definitely.

[03:10]

I mean that’s the other side of it. For anybody you want to reach in a B2B, there is an association or there’s a linchpin relationship-holder in those environments. You just got to find them.

[03:20]

That’s right. And I think that what really is the linchpin on the supplier side there is having a really awesome sampling team, the team that knows how to go out and find those organizations or find those providers that can provide those niche audiences. And sometimes it’s more than just finding one. You’ve got to stitch them together just to get the reach.

[03:40]

A lot of times. So, are you finding that your team in-house, are they actually doing the procurement or are you leveraging key relationships to do that?

[03:50]

Generally, leveraging key relationships to do that. Yeah.

[03:53]

Okay, cool. So, the show: What do you think? Were you able to attend any of the sessions today?

[03:59]

I haven’t up to this point. So, a cocktail hour will be my first session.

[04:04]

Hey, you know what? I think that easing into it is exactly the right way. Matt, thanks very much for joining me on the Happy Market Research Podcast.

[04:08]

Hey, appreciate it. Take it easy.

[04:10]

Bye.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Liz Moore – The Candor Company

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Liz Moore, Candorist and Partner of The Candor Company.

Find Liz Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/liz-moore-a54b452

Email: liz@thecandorcompany.com

Website: www.thecandorcompany.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

Hey, this is Jamin. We are live today at CRC at the exhibit floor here in beautiful Orlando. At least they tell me it’s beautiful. I haven’t been outside yet. I have the honor of chatting with Liz Moore, two words. She is one of the owners of The Candor Company, which is a qualitative-focused firm, and I’m looking forward to finding out more. Hi, how are you doing?

[01:05]

I’m terrific. How are you?

[01:07]

I thank you for asking. I think I’m doing okay. I do actually really want to get outside.

[01:12]

We were out earlier.

[01:14]

Oh, you’re such a show off.

[01:15]

I know. It’s swampy. It’s very humid. Yeah, it’s better in here.

[01:19]

It’s better inside. I don’t know. I feel like everything’s yellow now with the fluorescent lighting tint. It’s permanent. All right, so the show, how’s it been for you guys? You guys have, by the way, sorry about interrupting. Ask a question interrupt. That’s a terrible way to do it. You guys have the most bright and interactive booth on the show floor.

[01:41]

Thank you. Thank you.

[01:43]

Totally true.

[01:44]

It’s totally bad-ass, isn’t it?

[01:46]

Yeah, it is bad ass. You guys have just totally nailed the interactivity. For those that weren’t in here, it’s a ring light, which is something you use in photography to take a portrait photo. And it’s like super pro. Is it just like cell phone cameras? Oh, you even have a nice camera kit. Okay.

[02:06]

Totally legit. You should check the lens out.

[02:07]

All right, I will. What kind of camera is it?

[02:09]

It’s a Canon. It’s our photographer’s setup.

[02:13]

5D Mark III. Something fancy?

[02:15]

Yes, yes.

[02:17]

85 prime. Okay, so, tell me about your business, Candor.

[02:22]

That’s right, Candor. We are qualitative researchers who don’t like to necessarily think about ourselves as qualitative researchers. I think qualitative research has kind of gotten a bad rap over the years: very staid, very conservative, very traditional. Call a bunch of people into a room, total strangers; tell them to ideate for 90 minutes and just come up with something great. That doesn’t work, does not work anymore. We noticed that trend.

We’ve been together about 20 years, and we started noticing the trend about 10 years ago that when we could take out of that environment and either go into their environment or bring them to a place that’s really creative and it’s fun and it’s different—not just taking a focus group facility and going away from the standard setup to a living room setup, but actually taking them somewhere where it feels safe and there are really no boundaries. We just find that we get so much better and richer learning from people.

[03:26]

All right. Give me a little more context. Give me a favorite project.

[03:30]

Oh, my gosh, there is a ton of them. Well, a recent project. We were working with probably the second largest consumer packaged goods company, and we were doing some work with them to understand how consumers clean. And we were looking at shoppers at two of their largest retailers. And so, we recruited folks from those primary shoppers from the stores and understood their behavior in home over the course of two months, using an online journal. And then we picked the best of the best. So, we really got to know these people by everyday with their posting videos and content and us asking them questions and them responding. We had a good handle on who these people really were. Then we went in-home with them and we saw how their behavior that we saw that they were recording mobile, how it translated online. And it was really cool. We really got to understand their behavior from everything from shopping behavior to actually how they use the products to purchase intent, how they learn about new things. If we had called nine consumers into a focus-group room and asked them to do this.

[04:47]

Totally different.

[04:48]

No. “Well I think, yeah, I think I have that product that has the green label on it.”

[04:55]

Yeah. They really wouldn’t have the… We know that the recall is… Like my recall, everyone’s recall just diminishes. But the in-the-moment stuff is really important and being able to garner that over time gives you a good point of view on the participant. But then also incorporating video that actually can start functioning as an audition for how articulate and expressive the individual is, and it sounds like you use that information to pick a subset of your group or your participants to do additional exploratory work. Was that exploratory work on site at a location or what was that like?

[05:32]

Well, actually, that approach we use for any number of projects. We’ve also used it for a women’s cosmetic brand where we had mobile journals and again picked the best of the best. And then we picked a host. And then she had agreed to open up her home to some of her friends for a dinner party. So, we had it catered. There was no end time on it. We served wine; we served a great meal; we had a wonderful conversation. I think it lasted about three and a half hours.

[06:02]

You’re kidding.

[06:03]

And the clients were actually involved at the table.

[06:06]

That is so awesome.

[06:08]

And we’ve had so many experiences with clients saying, “I’ve never been that close to my customers and able to ask them questions. Like I’m always sitting behind the glass, but now I can sit there And I can touch them on the shoulder; I can give them a hug at the end and say, ‘Thank you so much.’”

[06:24]

That is so interesting. I’ve recently interviewed the head of insights for Samsung and then also last year it was Estrella Lopez-Brea. She’s head of insights for a cereal partnership with General Mills and Nestlé, which is a big company, even though nobody knows the name, right? It’s still Cheerio’s. It’s just in 136 countries. So, both of them independently, when I asked them about future trends, say that the decision makers inside of the company are moving from behind the glass and boardrooms to interact with the customer at the point of sale. There’s this wall that has existed for our whole careers that is now dissolving, and it’s been disintermediated because now we’re creating that access to the consumer in virtual real time. So, it’s exciting to see that play out. I’d never heard of the dinner, but that’s so intimate and so exactly the way that we should be interacting with customers.

[07:30]

Oh, and we’ve used that with physicians. We’ve used that for stay-at-home. We’ve done it around a small dinner table with cartons of Chinese food. We’ve done it in a beautiful home with catered meals. So it really doesn’t matter who the audience is. You’re just putting them in an environment where they feel respected. Their time is respected. And you’re also not forcing them into doing something that is uncomfortable, which is, “Hey, you got 90 minutes. Let’s work through this. Let’s work through this.” And plus, also in the past, kind of also breaking down those barriers like with our clients and their customers… But in the past, moderators were trained to be a blank slate. And, “Let’s not tell them what we’re thinking about; we don’t want him to know who the sponsor is and we wouldn’t reveal any information about ourselves.” But we find the more we can open up and, obviously, not every client project we can divulge who it’s for, but when we can, I feel like we get so much better learning because they feel vested and they understand what is expected of them and then they feel a part of the process.

[08:34]

Because they are, and the journey is where the learning is ‘cause that’s the tangible feeling that empathy is created. It’s all about that as opposed to the processing of a bar chart or something along those lines in order to make a business decision. I gave a talk yesterday and one of my favorite things to do is think about the… So, surveys are really bad conversations at scale, basically.
And so, we try to reduce everything to a Likert scale or whatever. And you think about a date: you would never use an NPS score to post-assess. You know if a date went well or it didn’t go well by a function of being part of the date. And so, you have the same thing with consumer experience. So what you’re doing is really tearing down those walls and creating that. And then, subsequently, so doing it at scale is a slightly different topic. But I am really interested in what is your end deliverable look like for the customer?

[09:29]

Oh, gosh. We still are tasked with writing PowerPoints sometimes, but more often than not, we are asked to create something that is visually beautiful because our clients know that their end clients, which are typically the C-suite, are not going to have patience for something that is not well done, that’s not well produced. And plus, my client doesn’t want to put that in front of these people. So we create something that is visually appealing. Often we give a longer version to our end client. We edit down something that’s easily digestible for C-suite that says, “Look, this is exactly what we learned and this is what you have to do next.”

[10:11]

Like the 11 slides or something.

[10:13]

Except we have to boil it down. And plus, another thing we’ve also recently taken to doing the past couple of years is podcasts. Not too different than this. But what we’re trying to do is we’re basically taking our learning and we’re bringing it to life. And then we’re also bringing in in those cases some snippets from interviews of actual customers talking that are supporting some of those points. And then my client can share it with her senior execs, and then they can listen to it in the car. They can listen to it whenever it’s convenient ‘cause what’s the point of spending all the money on the research if no one’s going to be interested in seeing the results and reading the results.

[10:50]

I’ve been saying this forever. The biggest opportunity for insight consumption is (and really to create a big lever for change in an organization so it’s like maximizing your ROI) is ALL PODCAST. You should be able to reduce your report into a… It doesn’t even matter how long; it could be a 45-minute thing. It doesn’t really matter. You’re not constrained by the length. It’s the ability of creating a story that’s re-tellable. But if you do that in a podcast, which is passively consumed, now all of a sudden you have the opportunity to talk to people, literally, that are outside of who’s in the room or the commissioner of the research or the particular stakeholder and that can get shared and distributed and disseminated it inside the organization, creating a broader view of the customer and empathy connecting. So it’s getting to the “why” and starting to change that behavior.

[11:45]

Like you just said, the whole empathy and connecting and without hearing the customer’s voice… We talk all the time about voice of the customer. But we’re talking about voice of the customer. I want to hear the tone of their voice when they talk about their fears. I want to hear the tone of their voice when they talk about my product or their competitors or an experience they might’ve had, or, when in some instances, when we’re actually able to put our clients in the room… We did a study back in April for a fast food company that wanted to ideate on the future of drive through, and we rented this beautiful home in Los Angeles for three days, invited nine total strangers. They spent eight hours together. We had our storyteller come in. We worked as a large group and then we broke it in mini sessions. And then, once people had their story, had their core story about what this future looks like, we worked with them one on one to help them kind of pull out the real core nuggets, and then they all presented at the end.

And then, these nine total strangers, they were all embracing at the end of the night, and they were sad, and it was amazing. And our clients were in the room. We had four clients in the room working in the teams. It was amazing. And our clients like, “We’ve never done anything like that before.” I’m like, “We should all be doing more of this because that really is the voice and the face of the customer.”

[13:11]

Are you going to get to see any of the speakers?

[13:14]

I hope so. I hope so.

[13:16]

Have you identified any that you want to go see so far? Or are you just fairly tethered to the booth?

[13:21]

We are tethered to the booth, but ironically, literally 10 minutes before you walked by, Jonathan said, “We should go to some sessions.”

[13:27]

All right, there you go.

[13:28]

And I was like, “Well, I don’t know if I want to do that right now.” And then you walked along and if I didn’t meet you,

[13:32]

…we would’ve met later. It would have been fine.

[13:34]

Well, we met in the elevator earlier.

[13:36]

That’s true. This is sounding like a…

[13:38]

…clandestine meeting.

[13:40]

Exactly. Liz Moore, The Candor Company. Candor, how’d you come up with the name Candor?

[13:46]

Well, candor, if you look in the dictionary means honesty, openness.

[13:49]

Isn’t that candor, and I’m mispronouncing it?

[13:52]

Well, you’re kind of saying it like condor. It’s a bird.

[13:56]

Candor. Okay, sorry, everybody who’s listening to this. It’s candor, not condor. Dumb ass. Anyway, have a great rest of your show, Liz. Thanks for being on the podcast.

[14:06]

Thank you so much. I appreciate it.

[14:08]

Everybody else, I hope you enjoy my hilarious spelling. Have a wonderful rest of your day.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Lana Babii – CoolTool

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Lana Babii, Head of Business Development at CoolTool.

Find Lana Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/lana-babii-1296781a/?originalSubdomain=mx

Email: lana@cooltool.com

Website: cooltool.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

Hi, this is Jamin. I am with Lana. CoolTool is the name of the company, and we are live at CRC in Orlando. Lana, how are you?

[00:43]

I’m super well, enjoying the event. Thank God, we’re not exhibiting. Sorry, boss. That I can communicate to everyone. I can talk to my peers, could listen to all the speeches and really, really enjoying everything happening over here. But, yeah, I miss you guys and I’m sending regards. It’s the Research-Results Congress where you are now.

[01:07]

Yeah, in Munich, right?

[01:09]

In Munich, yeah, exactly.

[01:09]

Yeah, that’s a big event. So, were you here yesterday?

[01:13]

Yes, I’ve been presenting basically for the corporate researchers regarding all our neuromarketing tools and so on. So, there is a great pleasure to talk directly to our customers, to see the feedback, to learn the questions they have, all these insights. It was really powerful. I really appreciate this opportunity.

[01:35]

Tell us about CoolTool.

[01:36]

Oh, basically it’s super fun. CoolTool is fun. What you do is just enjoy with CoolTool since we automate everything for our clients, for researchers of all the levels from the brands, from the agencies and so on. So CoolTool is a neuromarketing automation platform, which literally combines the very best from the traditional survey-based research and the non-conscious measurement tools. So, we give to our clients those techniques like eye tracking, the facial coding, implicit testing and so on but without any hardware and with the opportunity to get the results in the real time. And also, the great news of this year is that we finally, finally finalized the integrations with Dynata. We’re seeing all these biggest players in terms of online panels so that our clients, they have the direct reach out to their consumers of more than 50 million people around the world due to online panels, which are our official partners now.

[02:37]

That’s awesome. Congratulations.

[02:39]

Thank you very much.

[02:41]

This show is early Day 2, right? We have to tomorrow’s Day 3 and the final day. Are you staying through for tomorrow?

[02:52]

Of course.

[02:52]

What particular sessions are you looking forward to?

[02:57]

Well, basically, I have my list. The best thing about this list that I’m watching the agenda and they always have those, “Okay, should I go to this speech or that speech? Should they listen to this presentation or that presentation?” Basically today, the one I’m looking forward is the one from CMI and Pfizer. They are going to present the case. I really enjoyed the one that we had today in the morning from Google. Ed was super, super cool and engaging, but I think today I need to attend like… I am really interested in 14 presentations. But due to this intensive networking, I really hope I will attend at least five or seven. So yeah, that’s awesome. Especially I love the area that we have a mix of everything. We have presentations from the end clients, from the brands like they are case studies and so on, use cases. Also, this innovation stuff like we did for example, what presented my peers, it’s also amazing, right? All this like cutting-edge solutions as well as corporate presentations with the clients and agencies, which is tremendous, like to hear what problems they have, what they resolve, what are their pain points and so on, so something very alive.

[04:24]

Yeah, for sure. I love that. The cross-section here between client and vendors and technology is really interesting.

[04:33]

Absolutely, absolutely.

[04:35]

The exhibit floor is rocking.

[04:37]

Yeah. Basically, I was very surprised. I arrived yesterday early in the morning, and I saw no exhibitors. I was thinking, “Okay, maybe they will appear, you know, like 10 booths, 15 booths.” But this is so cool. And what I like about the organization part is that the organizing committee, they make us be here, and they stimulate the networking over here. And also, I love this game when you need to write to each booth to sign to win something. But this stimulates you to interact with the peers and so on. So, you cannot be like on your own, and suddenly you’re always in the mood. So, I’m really excited about that.

[05:15]

Totally, totally. CoolTool is the name of the company. If somebody wants to get in contact with you, how would they do that?

[05:22]

Well, any means is fine. Just cooltool.com – ask for a demo, ask for a personal meeting, ask for a call, anything. By the way, this is a great opportunity to announce that our marketing team gave me like a super chic opportunity to give a code, which is CRC2019. Using this code, you’re registered on the website, or you ask for them, or you simply send an email using this call saying, “Hello, here is the code” and you get the benefit of 2.5K US dollars from CoolTool.

[05:55]

Wow, I love the value. So again, the code is CRC2019. Enter that, and then they’ll get free access.

[06:07]

Yes. You get the value equivalent to this amount of money. So, you could, basically, even complete the whole project for free.

[06:16]

I’ve seen the tool. The tool is really good. All right. I’m sure you’re going to have some people check that out. Now listen, I do have a question for you. Of these two stickers, which one is your favorite podcast sticker? One is a shark and the other is a mafia guy.

[06:34]

I would rather play for a mafia. I like these games from mafia.

[06:41]

Thank you very much for being on the podcast.

[06:44]

Wow. Thank you, Jamin.

[06:46]

You’re very welcome.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Kevin Lewis – Cint

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Kevin Lewis, VP of New Business and Strategy at Cint.

Find Kevin Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-lewis-b0bb001

Website: www.cint.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

Hi, this is Jamin, and you are listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. We are live on the floor of CRC here in Orlando. I have the honor of having Kevin Lewis with Cint on the podcast. Kevin, how are you?

[00:46]

Doing great, Jamie. Appreciate the time.

[00:49]

Are you kidding me? I appreciate your time always. So, what is going on with Cint?

[00:55]

We’ve got a lot of great things going on. Obviously, with the recent announcements with the P2 acquisition, working tirelessly, Katie Gross, Jake Wolff, and the entire management staff. But we’re progressing at a great pace and excitement across the industry and our clients.

[01:15]

Yeah, I mean that was a big announcement. P2’s player, right? You guys are the mother of sample marketplaces.

[01:27]

Appreciate that.

[01:28]

No, it’s true. I mean 1998, 96 maybe, 98. So like, hold on. [to third party] Ann, I’ll talk to you in a little bit. Are you running around? [Ann answers in the background] You’re going… Okay, I’ll see up there. [to Kevin Lewis] Sorry. I love her.

[01:44]

She’s keeping it real.

[01:45]

Do you know Ann?

[01:46]

I do.

[01:47]

Okay, good. She buy from you?

[01:50]

Not directly through me though I’m not sure.

[01:52]

Well, I’d check that out, man. Anyways, so, now back to the podcast. All that’s gone. Sorry, Trudie. She’s going to be so pissed. “You make my job so hard.”

[02:07]

That’s part of being in a conference; it’s real time.

[02:09]

It is totally real time and I really dig it. So, you guys, P2 acquisition, the rationale for the acquisition: obviously more sample, right? We have a product problem in the industry, meaning a supply problem in the industry. There’s not enough people, respondents, or participants to deal with the growing demand of insights. So that has to be part of the investment or the acquisition thesis. Is that right?

[02:35]

Yeah, 100%. In today’s world, reach is important. Technology and scaling and what we’re trying to do is to provide our clients the opportunity to enable and empower them a more efficient way to collect and gather insights. And for us, it’s really identifying and discovering what their current business ecosystem is and figuring out what is the right solution. And sometimes for us, we’re trying to figure out—I always use the banking analogy in today’s world and it goes on the researcher side as well. You’ve got an area where traditionally people would walk into a bank and physically deposit a check. Then it evolved to being able to put that check inside of the ATM. And now it’s more programmatic: being able to take a picture. And depending on people’s lifestyles and how they work internally, traditionally, or if they’re trying to scale more towards technology, they’re in one of those stages. Are they still wanting to stand in line for 20 or 30 minutes on a Saturday to be able to deposit a check or do they walk into the bank and see that, “Oh, there’s 15 people in line, I know that I can deposit this check in the ATM.” Or do they know far in advance where they want to move and say, “Look, I don’t even want to go by to the bank. I’ve got two other things I need to do. I’m just going to take a picture and move on to my day.” And we’re trying to take the technology around our client’s needs and figure out what the viable solution is.

[04:11]

So frictionless.

[04:12]

Correct.

[04:14]

Yeah, when I think about market research in general, the biggest hindrance is not budget. The biggest hindrance is time and difficulty. So like market research in general is a complex discipline. And what technology is doing through creating ease of access and automating the different processes is it’s really addressing the logistical or the operational consideration of research so that it becomes easier to do stuff faster.

[04:42]

Correct. And for us, we just want to be the supply management platform of choice, and we want to understand, from the client’s perspective, their true needs and wants, and for us to find something that’s applicable in regards to whether it’s one department, two departments or three departments, but collectively them talking among each other to figure out their pain points and how potentially we can be a viable solution.

[05:07]

So what do you see then? ‘Cause there’s a couple of different platforms that are out there. You guys won a significant contract with Lightspeed, Kantar Lightspeed. That was a huge win for you. Congratulations.

[05:21]

Thank you.

[05:22]

That was last year, I believe. Or, was it this? Anyway, how are you guys differentiating yourselves in the marketplace?

[05:29]

For us, the differentiator is in regards to us being the engine or the hub because you can have a component of saying, “Look, we can take a marketplace and bring it to you.” But what we’re trying to show the industry is how to use our technology as an engine to do different facets across different business departments within that entity. And it’s a journey because it doesn’t happen overnight and depending on certain companies, they wait ‘til they get to a certain pain point to have those conversations. We’re trying to be proactive to have those conversations upfront now to say, “Look, you probably are in this state, but right now let’s avoid six months, nine months, 18 months from now and have an open dialogue of where you want to move to scale as a company.” And I feel that’s probably one of the biggest differentiators for us in regards to just talking about the simplified marketplace versus how we are going to be the technology backbone for that true client on our end.

[06:34]

So it sounds like when you’re talking about integration, it feels like it’s deeper or more than just the sample automation piece. It feels like what you’re talking about is opportunity growth in the potentially more full life cycle of data management. Is that…

[06:54]

Most definitely. And you hit that on the head because if we think about the P2 acquisition, we are trying to take our current technology along with the extreme background and research and technology acquisition that P2 has over what they bring to us to be able to take the integration to the next level for everybody that’s moving forward and to scalability. And to be a little more concise, it’s basically taking the technical aspect of it and really shore it in to be more, I guess you say, digestible to the industry because everybody fights change, but at the same time nobody wants to lose business to change. And I think people are starting to identify that and I think it’s resonating in some of the conversations and a lot of the presentations that are going around saying, “Look, how far can you take the traditional side and scalability?” And you can’t necessarily go one path or the other versus you’ve got to merge the two and to be able to evolve and we’re trying to work with clients on that solution.

[08:10]

The other leg of the stool here is quality. So one of the things that we’ve seen is there’s been a commoditization of sample in the space, right? Cause it’s definitely the case that price points have fallen. It’s really a degradation of the overall perceived state of quality—I’m not saying it’s real—I’m just saying that perceived state of quality. Now when you’re thinking about continuing to automate the processes, are you also thinking about addressing and creating quality stops or checks along those pathways?

[08:49]

100%. Quality is number one. Obviously, with scale and size you’ve got to understand across the different marketplace and within those individual panel owners of how we’re going to get a unified kind of “Did It” integrity and for that we tirelessly work right now GDPR compliancy. Obviously, like you said before, 20-year-old-plus company Stockholm base. You know, for us, we kind of went backwards from the Nordics to North America, stemming out in North America in 2010 and now with the P2 acquisition, it’s even more in front of us around quality. Because for us we want to make sure the consistency to be able to have the panels normalize and for our AI to take into effect at the respondent level, not the panel level, which is key, because at the respondent level we’re able to see the behavioral and the characteristics of that on how they do surveys.

And I think that helps us from the algorithm when it pushes out to the certain parameters that marketers and research are looking for in their research, that we’re giving them the right mix. And what I also think is the transparency that we bring. So, for example, if I have a client that says, “Hey, I’m doing N equals a thousand completes.” And they come back and say, “Hey Kevin, we have 25 open ends that are a little bit suspect. Can you look into that?” At certain companies they can only go so far into the layers. For us, we can know immediately where that respondent came. Have they been in am offender in the past? And we can have those relationships immediately with the panel owner to identify those needs and then correct it.

[10:35]

Got it. That’s huge. I mean, that’s huge. And I think what it does is it breaks the black box completely open, which is not being done right now. So what I mean by that is we’ve created on purpose these black boxes where you enter something in a request of a profile or whatever, and then you get an insight, right? So surveys, automated, etc., and insight and out on the other side. And we’ve subsequently lost the visibility that used to be part of just grinding and doing the process manually. Now what you’re talking about doing, which I think is really interesting as a differentiator in the market, is, as those gears become more transparent, then it becomes obvious when there is a bad player inside of the machine. And then you can start screening for that person or those behaviors subsequently, which just creates a continuing improving quality sample source.

[11:42]

Correct. And you hit it on the head, Jamin, because think about it like this. If you’re talking about a marketplace where you get your sample, you’ve got your N equals a thousand, being able to capture and the consistency of knowing where that came from and if you have any quality issues to be able to be transparent, to see it, to adjust it. And as you go from your first study to your fifth study to your tenth study, to be able to see how the market within that marketplace and the samples there from a consistency and a quality sample because there might be a panel that has a characteristic that might not be a good fit for that specific product, whether it’s B2B, whether it’s a behavioral purchasing study. If you see that difference, whether it be a scoring aspect of it or a norm, you can adjust that and say, “Okay, for this panel, this panel isn’t necessarily a good fit that’s looking for the quality of level that I’m looking for.” And to be able to have that transparency and identify that is key. Because the one thing I love about our marketplace is that, if a client isn’t aware of all the panels that are out there, there’s an information button for them to click to give all the history about that. So we try and be as transparent as possible and give them the opportunity to choose if this is something that fits their basic needs.

[13:03]

So this is kind of a on the spot and it’s going to be lengthy. So just bear with me. You don’t have to write it down. I just want to get your gut reaction. I’ve got a project. This is real life; N equals 1,000 by a few different countries: US, Mexico, Brazil, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Australia, Chile, Japan, Spain, Italy, Russia, Poland, Nordic countries, the whole lot of them, Saudi Arabia and Argentina. So was that 11? Did do that right? Or 16? 16.

[13:33]

That was over. I was going to say 15 or 16.

[13:37]

18 to 28 years old. A self-proclaimed gamer, whatever that means to them. They are a gamer. That’s it. LOI is like 10-ish minutes. So thinking about the breadth of countries there, is that feasible inside of your ecosystem?

[13:58]

That’s all in the wheelhouse. We’re talking about whether it be from certain countries that is heavily targeted from a profiling depth perspective or if we went from a natural fallout of gen pop where we assumed 15% to 35% of those age groups naturally filed and being gamers, that’s very achievable.

[14:17]

Got it.

[14:18]

And that’s what actually helps with the P2 acquisition because where we were at Cint where we could more than execute that project if we were to fall short near those countries, that’s where the partnership and the strategic scale that we’re doing with P2 takes us to the next level.

[14:33]

Forwarding the email to you right now for our RP hope you get me a bid back pretty soon.

[14:37]

Thank you, sir.

[14:38]

My guest has been Kevin Lewis; Cint is the name of the company. Kevin, if somebody wants to get in contact with you, how would they do that?

[14:46]

Yes, that’s easy. Just be able to get me at Kevin.Lewis@cint.com. I am the Vice President of the Western Region for New Business and Strategy.

[14:58]

Of course, I’ll include his contact information in the show notes. I hope you have a wonderful rest of your day.

[15:02]

Thanks for your time.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Kaizer Mbongeni Dhliwayo – South African Tourism

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Kaizer Mbongeni Dhliwayo, Researcher at South African Tourism.

Find Kaizer Online:

Website: www.southafrica.net/us/en

Email: kaizerdm@southafrica.net

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

Hi, everybody, you are listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. I have the honor of Kaizer (and I apologize ahead of time) Dhliwayo; South Africa Tourism is the name of the company. We are at CRC. Sir, how are you?

[00:46]

I am well. And, how are you?

[00:48]

You know what? I am doing pretty good. I can’t complain, actually. We’re in Orlando. Where do you live?

[00:53]

No, this is my first time in Orlando. Second time in the US, and I’m here for this conference and I’m learning so much, meeting so many new people. And it’s just so interesting.

[01:06]

When did you arrive?

[01:04]

I landed on Sunday.

[01:07]

Got it. So, you’ve gotten a slightly acclimated.

[01:10]

A bit, but I’m still not sleeping properly.

[01:12]

No, of course. Nor will you.

[01:13]

But then on Monday, I really tired myself out ‘cause I went to Universal Studios. Oh, my goodness. Like you guys do things properly because we have theme parks, but they’re not as big and not the variety of options. It blew my mind.

[01:30]

Yeah. It’s crazy. Right? Yeah, it’s like next level. Well, anyway, since there’s a separate podcast talking about Orlando’s theme parks, which is a really great, great topic. Tell me a little bit about South African Tourism.

[01:43]

Okay. So South African Tourism is a state-owned entity that was created purely to market the destination, the destination brand that sits with us. And we have offices all over the world. Our office in the US is in New York, run by Jerry and the team. And we have offices in Europe, Asia, Australia. The Middle East is one of our newer markets that we’re working to develop. Southeast Asia as well is a new area that we’re trying to get tourists from.

[02:12]

You know who did a good job of this was Ireland back in the day. So, their tourism division rebranded and they like doubled the number of tourists in a very short time.

[02:24]

And that’s the challenge for South Africa going forward. So our president made an announcement that we’re going to be in the next 10 years doubling tourism. So currently we get about 10 million visitors and we’re trying to get to 21 million by 2030. So that’s the effort going forward.

[02:41]

Where are your visitors coming from?

[02:43]

We have people coming from all over the world, but three quarters of our visitors are from the African continent, and we have offices in East and West Africa, Central Africa as well. And then, obviously, we have domestic tourists in and around South Africa.

[02:58]

If go to South Africa, what do I have to see? I have a one week. Let’s say it’s one week.

[03:04]

Okay. If you have one week, the plan depends on what you’re interested in because we have wildlife; we have adventure.

[03:11]

What am I going to do?

[03:11]

I would suggest because you seem like a nice, energetic person that you have to do a lot of adventure activities.

[03:18]

You nailed it.

[03:19]

We have the highest bungee jump in the world, which is in Eastern Cape.

[03:22]

Oh, that just already made my stomach go up.

[03:24]

So that’s something I think you would have to do. And it’s right next to Cape Town, so it’s like an hour flight from Cape Town. So, you can then see Cape Town, Table Mountain, Robben Island, and then drive down the coast. We have the longest coastline and the highway right next to it. So, as you’re driving, you’re just looking at the beautiful views and then you get to this tallest bungee jump in the Eastern province.

[03:47]

There was a movie called Endless Summer, which featured the beaches there. And I think, God, that would be… It’s like amazing. Is there any surfing?

[03:58]

Yeah, you can surf anywhere. Like I’m saying to you that we have a very long coastline. We have the Indian ocean on the one side; we’ve got the Atlantic on this side. So cold water in Cape Town; warmer water in Durbin, which is on the eastern coast and you can surf practically anywhere. And the most beautiful place to actually see is where the two oceans meet. You can actually see the color of the water being very different and it doesn’t mix.

[04:25]

And they meet. You can actually see where they meet.

[04:28]

Yeah. You see where it meets and you can actually tell that that is the Atlantic Ocean. That’s the Indian ocean. And the waters kind of don’t mix. So, there’s like a line.

[04:36]

Really? 100% I’m going to check that out. That is really cool. I’ve never heard that at 48 years old.

[04:44]

You see but that’s the thing about South Africa that there’s so much going on. It’s difficult for us to have a single narrative about the destination. Everyone thinks of us as this high-end Safari destination, but there’s so much more to us than that.

[04:58]

The show. What do you think? What’s your opinion so far?

[05:02]

I love this show so much. I wish I could live here just in this environment because there’s so many different ideas. There’s so many cutting-edge things happening here, and we’re in a position right now in South African Tourism of restructuring our organization and insights becoming a leader. And this room of people is basically, that’s exactly what’s going on here. So I’m hoping to learn as much as I possibly can.

[05:25]

Perfect. Well, you’re in the right spot because there are some great minds and companies represented not just on the exhibit floor but also from the speakers.

[05:32]

The speakers, the presentations have been amazing. I’ve learned so much. I’m recording as much as I can so I can take it back to the team as well.

[05:40]

Kaizer, South Africa Tourism. Absolute pleasure having you on the podcast.

[05:45]

Thank you so much, Jamin.

[05:46]

Say your last name one more time.

[05:48]

Dhliwayo.

[05:48]

Dhliwayo. Oh, dang it. Alright, well, everybody else, hope you enjoyed this episode. Have a great rest of your day. And as always, take the time, check out South Africa Tourism. I will include a link to the show notes, not just to their website, but also to some pictures I find on the seas meeting on their coastline. Have a great rest of your day.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Jonathan Ephraim – IntelliSurvey

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Jonathan Ephraim, Preisdent of IntelliSurvey.

Find Jonathan Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathan-ephraim-a1715a

Email: jephraim@IntelliSurvey.com

Website: www.intellisurvey.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

Hi, this is Jamin. You are listening to Happy Market Research Podcast. My guest today is Jonathan Ephraim, IntelliSurvey founder, co-founder, excuse me, right?

[00:40]

Yes, that’s correct.

[00:41]

Longtime competitor and friend. Sir, thanks for being on Happy Market Research Podcast.

[00:46]

Thank you for having me.

[00:48]

So we are on the show. They’re getting ready to release the hounds. We’re by the food. We may be eaten alive. Hopefully, they don’t mistake us for chicken legs. How are you doing?

[00:58]

Oh, I’m doing very well, thanks. I’m doing very well. This is a one of our first conferences. It’s the first conference like this that we’ve presented at, and we have a display. So it’s been fun to see people. We ordinarily are sitting in the background, and it’s nice to be in front.

[01:13]

So, IntelliSurvey, this is my perception, not necessarily reality, but IntelliSurvey from a brand perspective is these really intelligent people that have built this great software and service. Probably the thing that has always stood out to me, and Jamie and I used to lament our org structure is that you guys built your platform instead of having like full-time employees to program all the surveys, you actually created a network of people that were able to use your platform. Is that accurate?

[01:51]

No, it’s funny after all these years…

[01:55]

Well, wait the smart people is accurate, but the network part isn’t. I love…

[2:00]

Yeah, the network part isn’t. Yeah, what we did that was, I think quite different from others was, obviously, we separated out development from project management, but we didn’t separate out project management from programming. We always thought of that as them as being one function that there was a project manager who was a programmer. And one of the things that we did quite differently was we hired people who were more liberal arts-ish. When I say liberal arts-ish, I mean that not necessarily they were…

[02:32]

like linguistic type framework or…

[02:35]

Well, just people who were creative and good with words and good with problems. And those were the people that, I think, in many other platforms are the project managers, who are then interfacing with someone who’s a little more engineeringy, who’s like actually doing the stuff.

[02:52]

So you have one in the same. So then you trained those people on how to use your platform.

[02:57]

That’s correct. That’s correct. And we built a programming language that basically is very close to plain English that people can then just affix what amounts to a programming attribute using basically something very close to plain English. It’s something like “randomized:why,” which tells the system that you have to please randomize this on my behalf. And because it’s relatively close to plain English, anyone can do it. There are a lot of capabilities in the system, so it’s not the sort of thing that someone picks up right away. We are expecting in the next, I’d say three to six months, to come out with something that’s a more gooey DIY and we’re excited about that.

[03:44]

The thing that I really like about not having a gooey is, if the programming language is structured in a simple way, you actually have a lot more flexibility and you don’t have the overhead of a gooey. So it gets really, really easy to create surveys quick. So we used to do, we called them John Henry. Do you know the reference? So there’s this little kid’s storybook where a slave with two hammers and a mechanized steam engine, both are drilling two tunnels for train tracks at the same time. And whoever gets through first wins, right? Human versus machine. And so we would call it… We would do like a scripted version. So like you’re describing versus the gooey version of the platform. And it was really interesting to always see that the scripting version always won by a little bit or a lot in some cases.

[04:41]

And we found that as well in that. But on the other hand, I would say that one of the learnings that we’ve had over the last four to five years is we’ve been getting ready to… We were pushing scripting versions for a long time. And invariably the person who’s like us, who we talk to when we demonstrate our system says some variety of this. He says, “Look, I know that what you’re doing works. And I know it’s faster to use scripting, but my people, they can’t.”

[05:09]

They don’t want to do it.

[05:09]

They don’t want to do it. And maybe they can’t do it. It’s just too much for them. A scripting language is just for whatever reason too much for them. And one of the things that we’ve found, as we’ve been optimizing our approach for the gooey, is that certain aspects, if you time in motion a gooey, the same way you time in motion scripting, you can actually get it pretty close, but you really need to think from a time in motion perspective. You also need to really constrain the functionalities so you hide the complexities from the garden variety users that really don’t need to be able to, let’s say, order things in sequential groups in a particularly funny way,

[05:45]

I want to get a license like just a demo license. I’m really intrigued on the programming language part of it. That seems like so fun to do that, anyways.

[05:58]

Well, you’re officially out of Decipher now, right?

[06:00]

I’m 100% out. No interest or anything along those lines. That’d be really fun to do. I think it’d be interesting to do a blog post on—you could even co-write this— on the John Henry or time in motion. You know what I’m saying? And the trade offs that are involved when you start moving to a gooey, like a SurveyMonkey. I liked the tool and it has its place. It’s just like for me not my preferred way of doing stuff.

[06:34]

But I think one of the things that those of us who are… I still script surveys, and we have a team of 70 people that are scripting surveys. So we’re big believers in that ecology. But one of the things that we’ve found as we’ve scaled is that going to larger populations, you need things that are more gooey-ish. Not everyone’s going to be on the gooey. I think the power users are always going to have a preference for scripting. However, that’s not to say that the people who, if you think of the core workflows, if you can get people for whom scripting is too much to participate in the workflow so that they can sort of work together with the people who are scripting. And that requires a more, gooey-ish interface or a more iterative interface that can be exposed to people for whom scripting is too much.

[07:25]

One of the things that’s interesting about your story is you just basically said it a minute ago. You guys haven’t been at conferences. Like you and I have never, I don’t think, met face to face.

[07:36]

We have not.

[07:37]

Which is every one of the people that I have competed with, I’ve met for years.
at these conferences. And yet you’ve had tremendous success as an organization, in growth and brand. So like are you changing a behavior now? Is there something we should be looking for on the horizon with IntelliSurvey?

[07:56]

Yeah, I think we’re going to be significantly more forward than we have in the past. I think we’ve done very well within our market. We’ve grown by, we like to think, providing exceptional service. And so, every once in awhile some new substantive group comes along and finds us and that excites us. That’s been the approach we’ve had really for the first… I mean we’ve been doing this since 2001, so 17 years or so. And it’s really only in the last year or two that we’ve started to be more forward. In part, that’s because I think we want to expand to into populations a little bit more aggressively.

[08:32]

I think that’s really smart. I think the premise or mantra, “Do good work: get more work” in this industry has served you very, very well and will continue to be the bedrock of your organization. Now, that you start investing in the sales and marketing side of things, it’ll be interesting to see how you guys achieve your full potential, right? I mean there’s a limiter with word of mouth. So, as you get out there do presentations, like you are; be on the show floor, like you are; be on the podcast like you are right now; all of a sudden, there’s an elevation that starts happening with the brand that otherwise you just can’t get.

[09:10]

And I think at our core… I mean you guys were software guys, too, and I remember hearing that you guys had… It must’ve been about eight or ten years ago. The time is tricky for me, but I remember we started getting a lot of inquiries from your customers, from Decipher’s customers, and they said some variety of, “Hey, we used to have this code that worked and it doesn’t work anymore. Can you guys help us?” And we could tell that what you guys had really done was made a real commitment to being scalable. Cause as long as your custom, you’re just not that scalable. And that worked out very well for you guys. We’re dimmer than you were.

[09:51]

That’s not true.

[09:52]

But it’s taken us some time to learn that lesson. But I think from our side, we think we have a good set of code and, obviously, there are network effects and all. And so, if we’re really going to be valuable the way that someone like Qualtrics or someone like Decipher has been able to, we simply need to be out there and get more users, so that’s what we’re doing.

[10:11]

IntelliSurvey is the name of the company. Oh, really quick. I wanted to ask you, can you give us just the highlights of your talk?

[10:18]

Sure, the highlights of the talk we’re going to be presenting with our friends at Mondelēz with whom we’ve been working for a few years, and they have undertaken to bring some of the most complex research projects that are done anywhere in-house. Most of these kinds of projects, we understand, are done by agencies or consultancies, and they brought them in-house. They did so, in part, because they wanted to really acquire a sort of granular depth of knowledge about their market that was within their organization. And we’re talking together with Mondelēz about some of the hurdles that we had to surpass in order to help them be successful in that regard. So that’s what we’re talking about. Hopefully, it’ll be interesting for folks.

[11:06]

Yeah, that’ll be really fun. I’m looking forward to that. I’ll try to attend that. All right, great. IntelliSurvey is the name of the company. Jonathan Ephraim is the one of the cofounders and my guest at the Happy Market Research Podcast. Thank you very much for being on the show. It’s an honor to have you. Everybody else. I hope you found value here. Please take a screenshot, share five-star rating, Have a great rest of your day.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Joe Beier – GfK

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Joe Beier, EVP of Shopper and Retail Strategy at GfK.

Find Joe Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/joe-beier-2006545

Email: joe.beier@gfk.com

Website: www.gfk.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

Hi, this is Jamin. You are listening to Happy Market Research Podcast. My guest today is Joe. GfK is the name of the company. He’s been on a podcast already. He’s got a little bit of wine left in his cup. We are at CRC insights Association’s client-side event, and you gave a presentation today.

[00:48]

I did.

[00:49]

Give us a little bit of highlight.

[00:50]

We were talking about trust, the whole issue of consumer trust and how there are so many challenges to that space right now and how we’re really in a unique
era of trust just eroding very, very quickly and being challenged from so many different quarters. As dark of a journey as we knew it would be, we thought it was important to lay out what that landscape looks like today and some of the key factors and bring it home with a little more of an optimistic view in terms of some of the things that we extract from those learnings that we think can be good guidelines for folks that are trying to manage brands or create trusting relationships with consumers, rule rules of the road, if you will, to operate by. So, we laid out the challenges and then a little bit of what you might want to think about doing about it for some recommendations.

[01:41]

The audience can’t see this because it’s one of the slides that was presented today talking about optimism in the space. And I’ll include this in the show notes by the way. But how I really started connecting this is this issue of trust really is closely tied, in my opinion, to optimism and how people are feeling about the brands that they’re interacting with. So, my broader point is that it becomes really important for us as an industry to ensure that we’re garnering trust, especially among respondents, right? And that has to do with, I think again, the ethical context of how research is actually being done. I’m wondering, do you think that there’s going to be changes to the way that we do research over the next few years in line with maybe more, I don’t know what, either data privacy or transparency with sourcing sample.

[02:38]

Well, you’re probably not going to like this answer very well, but I think our presentation today took a very broad view of this whole issue, and I would assert that in the grand scheme of all the things coming at consumers and shoppers and respondents, which could all be the same person, of course ,depending on their state, but to me the incident of taking a survey or being interviewed is a pretty small speck on the landscape of all the things that they have to deal with. And so, I would expect some minor adjustments to be made there, but I don’t get the feeling that the industry has such a big impact on their total view of trust of the industry as a whole, that it’s due for major overhauls. I think we’re talking about some puts and takes kind of more at the edges of how we do things and not wholesale re-invention.

[03:31]

Yeah, for sure. It’s interesting to see… Picking on Facebook cause they’re, obviously, under the microscope right now with respect to a consumer privacy, I keep thinking that there’s this big opportunity in front of us to somehow connect consumer opinion (stated opinion) and transactional or behavioral data into that same data ecosystem in a cohesive way that makes the analytics part a lot easier, right? Traditionally, it has felt very arduous to try to integrate external data into a primary research data. So anyway, that’s…

[04:15]

I agree. It’s been messy, I think, historically. I think a lot of the things that were talked about at the conference today in terms of data science and AI and the computing power that is now available to us would certainly seem to hold the promise to make that whole integration process a lot less messy. I don’t think it’s going to be elegant tomorrow, but I think step one is less messy and then maybe we can get to elegant in time. And I think we get that. GfK has traditionally been more of a survey-based… You know, we’re a classic big, global research house that’s relied a lot like many of our peers on survey data. And we’re trying to get less reliant on that every year and work in more of the behavioral elements.

But I will say that I see a little bit of an overreaction in the industry against survey work. There’s a little bit of a tendency to throw the baby out with the bathwater in terms of people always make the point everything has to be behavioral. You got these almost philosophies or schools of thought. And the behavioralists are all like, “Don’t believe any of that data because, you know, people don’t do what they really say and everyone knows that and throw it all out.” And we’re like, “Well, not so fast because behavioral is great, but behavioral often stops short of telling you why things are happening.” I mean it’s great to frame up “the what,” this is the ground-level truth about what is happening transactionally many times.

But in terms of motivations and attitudes and all the things that go into that stew to get you to the point of that behavior, we think it’s vital to understand a lot of those things. And so, we were totally not ready to throw out survey work. And I think you have to be choiceful about how you use survey work, right? So, for example, we don’t usually ask questions about, you know, if you bought this category in the last three months, how much did you spend on your basket? That’s a terrible way to use survey data ‘cause no one’s going to remember that. Or what four websites did you go to last week when you were shopping for a smartphone? Bad. But things like we talked about today in our presentation a little bit: values. How do you feel about this value?

Is it important to you that someone acts in a way that’s responsible to the environment? How do you feel about shopping? Are you excited about it or is it a chore to you? There’re many things that are much more kind of lasting and salient to a respondent and much less prone to err that we think survey work is very well suited to measure. So, let’s use it there and not use it some other places where it’s more dangerous.

[06:59]

Okay. Last question on this subject. I could talk about this for a long time. I think it’s super relevant where you’re going with it, and I think it’s exactly on point by the way. The utilization of open-ended data or videos, how are you seeing that over the next couple of years?

[07:17]

We’re using it more and more. It’s great for texture and flavor and richness, if you will, of the finding. So that’s one reason we use it and also technologically what I just talked about in terms of integration of behavioral and survey data. There’s also a forefront obviously in terms of this open-ended data, classifying and reading it. And that’s all becoming much more automated too. So that’s much less labor intensive as well. So yes, we do it to enhance our insights, but one of the places we actually use it a lot is in the socialization of the study and of the findings. So, our stakeholders are typically the insights folks at various companies. We do all the work, a lot of work in consumer-packaged goods and other industries, tech and other places.

And our stakeholders at the end of a project have their own support network within the company to socialize the findings among. And the higher up you go up the corporate ladder, the less people want to read ironically, and they’d rather watch videos. And the videos have a lot of utility in encapsulating a lot of the findings that could be done in a sort of more sterile PowerPoint presentation. But our folks really like the extra topspin that they get of being able to make the point with some of the data, but then put a nice bow on it with a video that kind of reinforces it.

[08:47]

See, I think you’re right. It’s about humanizing the intangible in a way that creates repeatability. But it is about the humanization of that abstract data, which is quant, because nobody thinks in numbers. (Some people do, but most don’t.) And then it creates this like repeatable story inside of the organization.

[09:05]

Yeah. It’s humanization and putting a face on it and absolutely. That’s right.

[09:08]

Yeah, for sure. I love that. Last question: You sold the business to GfK.

[09:15]

I did.

[09:16]

Tell me a little bit about the business.

[09:19]

The business was called Interscope, and it was started by me and about five other colleagues that had spun out of another shop that we had all worked at called Meridian. Meridian was a place I went in about the year 2000, and they were more of a category management, a little bit of shopper organization. That’s kind of during the go-go days of category management as you may recall. And so, it was kind of a great place for me to get into consulting. I had been in brand for a few years before that on the marketing side. And we liked the kind of work that we were doing. We didn’t like the company that much, so we spun out and really took it… Interscope was, we called it a kind of a shopper marketing consultancy. We held on to some of that same category management capability, but morphed the business more towards shopper marketing strategy and consulting, a lot of go-to-market stuff, some retail re-invention stuff. So, we had kind of an interesting mix of things— all kind of related and revolving around the shopper. And GfK had a very well-established business in North America around a lot of consumer insights and consumer activation, but was candidly pretty weak in the shopper space. And so, they wanted to muscle up in shopper and we were kind of at the time an up and coming agency and conversations were had and they came calling. And we weren’t even really looking to sell the company at the time. We had been around for about five years, grown Interscope into a nice viable shopper company, but we decided we’d be an even better proposition if we could add all the rich research capabilities that GfK brought. I mean I was like a kid in a candy store.

I was having to beg, borrow and steal research insights before in a very entrepreneurial environment at Interscope and now was like, “Oh, my God, we do facial recognition. We do blah, blah; we do survey work. We do…” So, it’s been a really nice evolution to a really now a pretty full service. We managed to hang on to a lot of the consulting and a lot of the smart business thinking that we brought to our clients in the Interscope model, but now really flush it out with an ability to go out and get some really rich insights to work with.

[11:35]

And of course, I’m familiar with Interscope back in the day. So anyway, Joe, it is an honor having you on the podcast. I think we should do an extended episode at another time.

[11:44]

Sure. It’s been fun. Thanks for having me in.

[11:47]

Time for a drink too.

[11:49]

All right, sounds good.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Emily Palmer Brown – Wells Fargo

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Emily Palmer Brown, VP of Digital Manager at Wells Fargo.

Find Emily Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/emily-palmer-brown-5b76648

Email: emily.w.palmerbrown@wellsfargo.com

Website: www.wellsfargo.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

We are live today at the CRC, which is corporate research event in association with the Insights Association, and we are on the exhibit floor. Cocktails have been flowing. I’m one deep. Emily brought it to me. Emily Palmer Brown with Wells Fargo, thanks for being on the podcast.

[00:51]

It’s my pleasure.

[00:52]

So, tell me a little bit about what you’re going to give in the presentation.

[00:55]

So, my partner, Sharon, and I are going to be talking about bringing the human to life in market research. Oftentimes people will do quantitative research and develop market segments. And what we’re presenting on is how to illustrate and illuminate really the humans in there with retail personas or consumer personas or experienced personas and how people can create their own, how we care for and nurture and create ours, how we use them day to day.

[01:28]

So, personas in the context of like marketing or…?

[01:32]

Yeah, that’s a good question. So yes, in any context really. So, we primarily support the digital design experiences. So that’s product line of business as well as designers. And Marketing Wells Fargo is an enormous organization.

[01:50]

It is a big company.

[01:51]

It is a big house. And marketing tends to have their own research, what we’re very friendly with. They do different types of research. We use our personas, (See, this is a spoiler alert. If somebody listens to this before my talk tomorrow.) and we use our retail personas to truly understand the emotional drivers of user behavior to help inform strategies or design. So, really specifically where will somebody be using this and how will they be feeling when they’re using it?

[02:24]

Is that like sits next to customer experience or user experience?

[02:28]

We sit right in customer experience, user experience.

[02:32]

Got it.

[02:32]

We sit right in the experience design group.

[02:34]

Perfect. Okay, that makes a lot of sense to me. Give me a little bit about your background ‘cause we’ve just met, give me a little context.

[02:40]

We’re only one beer friendly. So, I started in social work actually.

[02:47]

Oh, you’re kidding.

[02:48]

No, I’m not. I am passionate about people and making sure that people can make choices to make changes or live the life they want to live. And social work, I think, is typically thought of with the downtrodden and the underprivileged. And that while that’s true, humans across the board, we all have aspirational lives that we want to live, and we all have things that get in our way. We get in our own way. And so, nine years ago, before I joined Wells Fargo, I was really excited about the intersection of finance and technology.

[03:22]

Interesting.

[03:22]

I thought it really would level the playing field. And it does, right? Information is so available. There’s tools readily available. And so, I get really excited. I don’t work in a bank by accident. I work at a bank because I come from a background in social work, and I’m all about informing people or making sure that information is available so that people can be empowered to live the life they want to live.

[03:45]

Think about WhatsApp, picking on them for a minute. India, for example, they’re leveraging WhatsApp to conduct financial transactions, which is the core of this micro-shopping environment, right? I don’t have enough information to be able to give you a real example without sounding like a jackass, but it allows you to transfer money, which is the big problem and conduct these activities that otherwise you would not be able to do with just cash.

[04:12]

You think about what is so exciting with finances today. So, my son… I have a collection of kids and one of them plays hockey and was going off with his hockey buddies. And I said that I would pay for his part of the house. So, he sent me a text, “Hey, could you send me 50 bucks for the house?” I accidentally touched the 50 in the text probably to say, “Oh, my goodness, $50! Where am I going to find $50?” But I touched the 50 and, in that moment, I was able to send him $50 without leaving the text message. Never mind the app, never mind opening another app, authenticating myself, picking an account, blah, blah, blah. Right? It was so seamless. It was frighteningly easy to give away my money.

[04:57]

I mean, it’s powerful.

[04:58]

I flushed my phone down the toilet immediately after.

[05:02]

You wish. I’m going to send you a text right after this. And it works the other way, right? I mean, nobody’s texting us money, but on the other side of it,

[05:11]

…but they could.

[05:11]

They could. You could.

[05:12]

You could. Let’s exchange numbers.

[05:13]

Insights Nation Look in the show notes for our numbers.

[05:17]

Support this podcast. Text money.

[05:21]

Yeah, that’s right. I feel like it’s turned to one those like telethons back in the day.

[05:25]

Oh, we could entertain. I mean, that’s what they did.

[05:28]

They did. That’s right. Unfortunately, not quite that. Who was the big telethon guy?

[05:33]

I know this. Jerry Lewis.

[05:35]

Jerry Lewis. That’s right. Sorry, folks. I’m not going be able to pull that off, so…

[05:40]

I’ll take credit.

[05:41]

Have you seen any interesting companies? I know you’ve been canvassing the place.

[05:45]

I, at my core, am still a goober, and so I gravitate to the people who have actual books because I love books. I love books, but there’s lots of exciting things here. And again, that intersection of technology and research, that’s one of the reasons that I’m here is because there’s so much happening out there, and there’s lots of ways to constantly be in touch with customers or prospects or just have your finger on the pulse. And it’s really all about staying connected to people, which rebuilds community, which technology is kind of maybe breaking down or maybe creating. It depends on the day how I feel about that one. But there’s a lot of really exciting things happening and there’s a lot of neat vendors here with terrific ideas doing things that I didn’t know were happening. So, I’m thrilled.

[06:34]

Yeah, it’s really cool. I would recommend… I don’t get paid for this. There’s a company over here…

[06:39]

But if you did, they could text it.

[06:40]

Yeah, that’s right, called SightX.

[06:43]

Wait, did I meet that person earlier?

[06:46]

I can’t remember.

[06:47]

This probably doesn’t need to go on the podcast.

[06:48]

But, anyway, they’re right over there. Emily Palmer Brown,

[06:53]

Palmer Brown, yes.

[06:54]

…with Wells Fargo. Thank you for being on the Happy Market Research Podcast.

[06:58]

Thanks for having me.

[06:58]

What do you think about our stickers?

[07:00]

I love your stickers, but the podcast people can’t see them. So, I’ll visually describe this happy shark who’s sporting a lighthouse tattoo, or is that a Marlboro man tattoo. Oh, it’s a tattoo of the Happy Market Research.

[07:15]

It’s the Mafia.

[07:17]

Okay. All right, kids, well, I’m bringing you stickers. Don’t say I don’t bring you anything.

[07:21]

Have a great rest of your show. Good luck on your talk tomorrow.

[07:24]

Thank you very much.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – David Paull – Engagious

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews David Paull, Co-Founder and CEO of Engagious.

Find David Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/davidpaull

Email: david@dialsmith.com

Website: engagious.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

Hi, this is Jamin. You are listening to Happy Market Research Podcast. My guest today David Paull, Engagious. I remember when I had a hard time saying that. Engagious is the name of his company, and he is a fellow podcaster here on site doing Audible Insights.

[00:50]

Correct.

[00:51]

In association with the Insights Association. What do you think about the show on Day 2?

[00:55]

I love CRC. It’s always one of my favorites. Get to reconnect with a lot of industry colleagues. Caliber of speakers is always top-notch, both outsiders as well as the corporate researchers that they bring up on stage and all the suppliers who have so many interesting things to share. So, I always liked this one. It’s great.

[01:15]

Yeah. I really think the big hack here is there’s a ton of corporate researchers. So, it’s really incumbent if you want to punch through to figure out… It’s not about the shiny booth; it’s about how do you make a personal connection with that person. I’m getting that more and more and more. The corporate researchers have so many options today. It’s a highly competitive place; so, you’ve really got to figure out how you can grab their attention and then decide if it’s a good fit quick and then add value by steering them someplace else if it’s not.

[01:51]

Yeah. And like one of the speakers talked about this morning, at the end of the day, it’s all about the value that you deliver, and it’s about the “why,” not the “how” and the “what;” the “how” and the “what” is, of course, important. But that comes after the “why,” after clients are confident that the “why” can be met.

[02:09]

Right, exactly right.

[02:10]

It’s knowing how to lead with the solution. The challenge with trade shows is they’re geared to be all about here’s what we do. It’s splashed all over.

[02:23]

It’s like speed dating.

[02:24]

Yeah. So that’s a challenge with the model overall. And I’ve struggled with that myself when I’ve been on the other side of the booth. It’s challenging to try to have those more personal conversations when it really is kind of a drive-by.

[02:41]

Whenever I think about activation at a conference, I’m always like, I won’t exhibit at a conference if I’m not speaking. Do you have like rules of thumb?

[02:51]

I do. I rarely exhibit anyway because a lot of the work that we’re really trying to grow right now is consultative in nature. So, it’s a difficult thing for me to try to do from inside of a booth. It’s one of the reasons I got into podcasting like you and formed a relationship with Insights Association for theirs. For me, it gives me a new way in. So, I get to attend. Ideally, if I can speak, that’s great and if I can talk to people through a podcast, it’s a different way for me to make a connection with people than from the other side of a trade show booth. So, for me it’s just really trying to hack the system and figure out how can I add value, but also how can I get more value for myself for the time.

[03:39]

There’s a guy walking around with headphones on trying to talk to other people and that just makes me laugh.

[03:47]

I know. The headphones say leave me alone. But then trying to talk to people, it’s incongruent.

[03:51]

Like you’re walking around talking, eating and drinking. It’s epic. It’s like I only want to engage with… I am shut off unless I want to engage with you. And he just took his headphones off to talk to somebody. Do not approach me.

[04:02]

That’s trade show life, man. You see it all, right?

[04:05]

That’s epic. Anyway, sorry. So, tell me about your podcast. How, how’s it going? Audible Insights.

[04:11]

Yeah, Audible Insights is going really well. So, I recently took over as producer and host of that. Paul Kurtz took care of it for a good number of years, did a great job. And I’m thrilled to take the helm now. So, it’s great because I get to talk with market research leaders from both the client side and the supplier side and just try to bring good content to the industry. I think it’s a great value that the Insights Association brings to the whole research community, whether you’re a member or not. Just find it on iTunes or Google Play and listen. And so, you’re really just trying to deliver value, and I think it’s going great. It’s a lot of fun.

[04:45]

I see you’ve got two podcasts you’re running now.

[04:50]

Yeah, the Engagious podcast is the one that I’ve been doing now. We started about the same time early last year, and that one’s more focused on audience engagement, which is really what Engagious is all about. And then, the Audible Insights is really more strictly market research focused. So yeah, working on both of those.

[05:10]

Cool, man. And you actually have a day job too.

[05:12]

I have a day job and recently started a YouTube channel, so I’m a glutton for punishment, I think.

[05:16]

Oh, wow. Congratulations on all fronts.

[05:19]

Well, as long as it all works, I’ll take the congrats. We’ll wait and see.

[05:23]

If somebody wants to get in contact with you. How would they do that?

[05:25]

LinkedIn is great, David Paull, P A U L L. Same goes for Instagram, Twitter. Our website is Engagious, E N G A G I O U S.com. And always love to connect. So anytime.

[05:41]

David, it’s an honor having you on the podcast.

[05:42]

Thanks for having me. I appreciate it.

[05:43]

Everybody else, if you found value in this episode, screen capture, share. As always, your five-star ratings are my life blood. Have a wonderful rest of your day.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Colson Steber – Communications for Research, Inc.

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Colson Steber, Co-CEO of Communications for Research, Inc.

Find Colson Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/colsonsteber

Email: csteber@cfrinc.net

Website: www.cfrinc.net

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

Hey, everybody. This is Jamin. You are listening to Happy Market Research Podcast. We are live at the Insights Association’s CRC event. What city are we in? I keep forgetting.

[00:42]

Orlando.

[00:43]

My guest today is Colson Steber; Communications for Research is the name of the company. Colson, thanks for being on the show.

[00:51]

Thanks.

[00:52]

You got to tell me something. This is the morning of Day Two. Did you go to any content yesterday?

[01:00]

I went to Steve August coaching.

[01:02]

Tell me what you thought.

[01:04]

I loved the tools he introduced to us in the session but did not engage a lot with the conversation during the session. Struck up a conversation with him afterwards and ended up taking up the entire afternoon getting free coaching for about two and a half hours.

[01:20]

I hope you bought him a drink or something.

[01:21]

Unfortunately, not. We got interrupted a lot since we sat in the lobby and lots of people walk past us that were arriving for the conference.

[01:27]

Does the ROI for him, does that pay off down the road, you think? Like good feelings?

[01:33]

For him?

[01:35]

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean he’s now in a coaching business. So potentially, right. I mean, I now know his story. He knows my story and by…

[01:44]

There could be work down the line. What was one of your big takeaways from the conversation? Because the ROI might be somebody listens to this show and then reaches out to Steve August for coaching.

[01:56]

We talked a lot about how to go deeper in my niche of agriculture sector research without abandoning everything else we can do and can service.

[02:14]

It’s the classic mile wide, inch deep versus go really deep in a single thing. And you’ve got to do both in a lot of cases.

[02:23]

So, as I was mentioning to you directly before this, I’m rethinking my marketing strategy for 2020 significantly and working to move entirely away from this list of services-based website to what outcome do we create for our customers?

[02:44]

Dude, I mean that’s a really… Okay, so, let’s back up. Give our audience a little context of Communications for Research. What is it you guys do?

[02:53]

We add value by helping to plan research, communicate that plan in terms of the sampling plan and field work and how it’s going to get executed and then providing services to do so. And I call that research logistics. The best example being working with researchers themselves, typically as third-party contractors to understand how they’re going to access the audience, help them with the screening criteria and what we’ll do, how we’ll reach them and going out and providing all of those data collection services and handing back something that they can actually use at the end rather than just a flat data file.

[03:36]

I love it. There is a trend in the last 12 months that I’ve seen towards the term research ops or research operations, but it’s actually research-ops one word. And there’s two different Slack channels that I have just been created that I’ll send to you if you’re interested. What’s happened is there’s this new generation of researchers, and they haven’t been schooled in research operations, but they’re primarily coming at it from UX and CX or user experience and customer experience versus traditional market research. So, as those areas are flourishing, there’s this like void of how do I… play in research. And that’s where, I think, to your point, there’s a really big market opportunity in order to help these companies and individuals grow and execute their research. So, they’re focusing more on the insight and less on the operational consideration.

[04:31]

Yes, absolutely. So, actually, being the research operation, being able to take the fact that I need to include research in my process and it is part of my process, but I need someone to manage and execute that process, we can come in and not be the order taker but actually work alongside of the team to understand the research outcome, set up the plan, communicate it, and iterate it as you go through research. I would say research is a gray area and if we knew the answer, we wouldn’t be researching it. Oftentimes we work in really difficult… All the … like the agriculture sector or heavy equipment or financial services where you have to get into the field, try to engage an audience, and then iterate based off of the actual outcome that you’re getting.

[05:20]

So, if somebody wants to get in contact with you, how would they do that?

[05:23]

Through my website CFRInc.net or directly to me at see C. Steber@CFRinc.net.

[05:32]

Perfect. I love the access right away to the head honcho.

[05:37]

Yes, having a new business development account manager that specializes in it, but I still make sure to have a personalized relationship with every single, potential, new customer that we have.

[05:51]

Hey listen. When I was CEO Focusvision, I did the same thing. Like if it was a customer I was going to get to know the customer, which is just how it, and that actually pays big dividends.

[06:01]

It’s my role in the business is a finance and vision. And so, I want to understand exactly who our customer is and discuss what that relationship could look like for us and how we can service it best back with my client services team when a new person comes and finds us.

[06:28]

The connectivity to the customer really creates this beautiful improved value proposition so that you are creating and evolving your business around what it is exactly that the current customer is looking for because we’re always in a state of evolution; we haven’t like figured it out. Like social recruiting is changing. And you nodded vigorously there, right? So, you see there’s all these different ways of communicating and connecting with perspective participants.

[06:59]

Correct.

[07:00]

And so, to that end, we’ve got to make sure that we’re recruiting the right people for our customers. And that’s where it gets really…

[07:08]

There is actual expertise in knowing how to engage the audience to get them to do research.

[07:13]

Exactly. It’s hard.

[07:15]

Right. And what unfortunately, the data collections field services role has been put down into this order, taking not an equal part of the team position. And that’s how I refuse to operate.

[07:32]

Yeah. That’s beautiful. I think that’s exactly right. It’s not a commodity.

[07:36]

So, I oftentimes am the guy that has our project manager or myself forced that discussion to say, what is the screening criteria? Does it actually meet the research outcome that they’re interested in? And looking at the logic based off of, are we including the people that will provide a relevant opinion to the research we’re working to conduct?

[08:05]

Perfect. Colson Steber, Communications for Research. Check them out. Everybody else, if found value in this episode. please take time: screen capture, share it on social media. You can find Colson’s information inside of the show notes. Have a great rest of your day.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Anil Damodaran – Course5 Intelligence

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Anil Damodaran, Vice President of Adomate at Course5 Intelligence.

Find Anil Online:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anildav/?originalSubdomain=in

Website: https://www.course5i.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:31]

Hi, this is Jamin. You are listening to Happy Market Research Podcast.
My guest today is Anil Damodaran, Course5 Intelligence. I’ve had you (not you, specifically), but somebody else, right, on the podcast.

[00:42]

That’s right. I believe you’ve spoken to Manish.

[00:45]

Yeah, that’s right. Yeah, Manish. That’s right. I like him very much actually. So, how are things going at Course5?

[00:51]

Very good. We’re doing a lot of interesting new things and so, we’re really excited to see where this year pans out.

[00:59]

Tell us the audience, give a little context, what is Course5?

[01:03]

So, Course5 is a global, digital and analytics-based company. So, we focus on everything to do with digital AI and analytics and, basically, anything that you use data to make decisions that’s where you would bring in Course5.

[01:25]

Got it. Think about your favorite project. Describe that project for us.

[01:32]

Sure. So, I can talk about what we recently did with Microsoft.

[01:38]

Okay, good. I’ve heard of them.

[01:40]

So, my role at Course5 is that I manage a product called Adomate, and essentially, it’s an advertising intelligence system that allows you to analyze video creatives and ad testing data, and then really be able to identify variables that move and ad up or down in terms of engagement, provide meta-level analysis in terms of overall ads and things like that. So, we did this project with Microsoft recently, and we had some really interesting learnings in terms of what specific kind of variables were important. When you say look across the purchase funnel—all the way from awareness to perception to impact—what variables seem to be driving a campaign up or down. So, we had a really interesting project, and I just spoke about it at the event as well.

[02:43]

I apologize about missing it; I will pick it up though ‘cause they’re going to be releasing the speaking sessions on their app. So, I’ll definitely listen to it there. Thank you for giving me the heads up. Separating out a purchase decision based on a set of factors is hard to do and very powerful because then you start understanding exactly how you need and what you need to talk to to your customer personas in order to help connect with them on an emotional level. Are you doing anything in the qualitative space? Are you incorporating any qualitative type data into your analytics or reports?

[03:18]

Yes. So, for example, if you’re looking at open-ended coding data that’s coming in from your survey results, or if you’re looking at user-generated comments that are coming in from social data, all of that text analytics, that’s how we would bring in the qualitative piece of it. If you’re talking very specifically about other types of data, we haven’t moved into that yet. Our roadmap right now is centered around text images and video and audio. That’s where…

[03:57]

I love that. Images and video, that’s huge. So, are you analyzing video at scale?

[04:05]

Yes, ad creatives. And that’s what Adomate does: it goes into video creatives, analyzes it at a frame level, pulls out variables that are part of each of those frames, quantifies it. And then you’re able to then relate that back with all of the surveyed later data that you’ve picked up.

[04:26]

So see, that’s actually really powerful. This is what I’d like you to do. Send me some links with examples, and we’ll include it in the show notes. If you’re listening to this episode, I can’t underscore enough the power of leveraging video and analyzing video. Let me put it this way. I recently have been doing a lot of Facebook ads and I do a ton of AB testing. I don’t exactly know what ads going to work, but what I do know is that if it’s video versus picture, it outperforms six to one. It is insane; it’s crazy So, if you’re not using video in your paid advertising or regular organic drops, then you’re really missing a material opportunity. It’s harder. It’s more expensive to do it. I get that. But what you’re talking about is really being able to analyze, write videos in order to put the right stuff up.

[05:21]

That’s right; that’s right.

[05:22]

That’s very impactful. So send me those links. I’ll include in the show notes. Everybody else, take the time, check out the links. If somebody wants to get in contact with you, how would they do that?

[05:32]

You can write to me on my Twitter handle. It’s ANILDAV. So, I’m on Twitter, or you could write to me at Anil.Damodaran@Course5i.com

[05:45]

Anil Damodaran, Course5. Check them out. Sir, it’s been an honor to have you on the podcast. Thanks very much.

[05:51]

Thank you so much, Jamin.

[05:53]

Everybody else, have a great rest of your day. Thank you so much for tuning in. We’re back to the beverages.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

2019 CRC Series – Angela Pack – Askia

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Angela Pack, Business Development Manager at Askia.

Find Angela Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/angela-lebedis-pack-3186b01

Website: www.askia.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

I have Angela Pack with Askia. We are at the Insights Association’s big event. What is it called?

[00:41]

Corporate Researchers Conference.

[00:42]

Thank you. CRC for short. Yes, that’s right. We are on the exhibit floor. There is the promise of alcohol over your right shoulder, which I’m super excited about. How about yourself?

[00:52]

I am eyeing those little EOS lip balms and the tiny little things of mints, so…

[00:58]

You’re such a good human being.

[00:59]

I’m going to be a little lurker later and maybe grab a few things to take home.

[01:03]

You already grabbed one of my stickers.

[01:05]

I did.

[01:05]

The shark one, I think.

[01:07]

Shark. I love shark week.

[01:08]

Yeah. What was your point about sharks?

[01:09]

They have to keep moving or they will drown.

[01:12]

I kind of feel like that sometimes.

[01:14]

I feel more like the turkey that if I stand outside with my mouth open, I’m going to drown.

[01:18]

I didn’t know that was a thing.

[01:20]

That’s a thing.

[01:21]

Really. Okay, well, there you go, Insights Nation. We did not know that that is a thing.

[01:28]

All sorts of color.

[01:29]

Yeah, that’s great.

[01:30]

So Askia, you guys, I hear really good things. Richard Collins, of course, a dear friend of mine over the years, worked for me at another company, and he’s based out of London right now, I believe.

[01:41]

He is based out of London, and he brought me on in July.

[01:44]

Okay, good. So, where were you before?

[01:47]

I was actually on the qual side of things. And then prior to that, I was in the panel world for a very long time.

[01:56]

That’s been an interesting space with… I’d love to talk to you more about that, but I want to like, first I want to dive in: tell me what is going on with Askia. And then we’re going to shift gears and talk about the conference.

[02:06]

All sorts of things are going on with Askia. We have products in development. We’ve got new partnerships that are bringing us things like platforms, charting. So a relationship with ETABS and so just bigger and better, and we’re expanding our US capabilities and that’s where I came on. So we have a completely female, US sales team, which is me. We’re 100%.

[01:36]

I was super excited. So, is it expanding? Like are you hiring? What’s going on?

[02:42]

We are looking for people in the US.

[02:43]

Okay, perfect. And if they want to contact you, I will get your card and include that information in the show notes.

[02:49]

Perfect. It’s very easy, Angela@Askia.com

[02:53]

That is really easy.

[02:54]

It’s super… Although people keep calling me “Anskia,” yeah.

[02:57]

‘Cause it feels like it needs to be fancier. Anytime you’re from Paris, I feel like it needs to be turned up a little bit.

[03:04]

I’m definitely not cool enough to hang out with our Paris office people.

[03:07]

Oh, whatever. Yes, you are. Yes, you are. You know, about shark week. So, first day of the conference – what’s your highlight?

[03:13]

My highlight, I would say, I attended a breakout session earlier about creating the ideal client, and what drew me to that was the language in the title “creating” because I think a lot of sales people make the mistake of sell, sell, sell, try to fit a square peg into a round hole and with something more niche like what Askia is doing, not everyone is going to be your client. You have to find the exact sort of secret sauce as to what their pain points might be, what we have to sell. And so, creating those opportunities versus just sending out spam emails saying, “Do you want software?” because that’s never going to work.

[03:51]

I actually think this is a really important point. It’d be fun to do a full episode on this at some point. But you’re right: It’s easy to follow a script and we’re kind of getting conditioned to like that with tools like Drip and others where it’s like I’ve got my sequence of 16 emails I’m going to send with the intention of building a relationship with you. But the reality is, at least from my experience, and I’ve been using Drip now for three months, Eric Santos and myself. And we’re doing an AB test, our Drip campaign versus the same content but slightly altered, a little more context, and individually sent.

So, the Drip is underperforming at a 20 to one. So for every lead that we’ll get on Drip, we’re getting less volume out. So it’s kind of interesting how, in my opinion, if you can just take the time to make the connection and you’re quickly screening out if this is not a good fit. And you can even do one better if you say I know who is a good fit for your particular need. Even though you don’t get a piece of that transaction, that builds value over time.

[04:54]

Absolutely.

[04:55]

Yeah, for sure. So, Steve August, I think, was giving that presentation.

[04:58]

He was giving that presentation.

[04:59]

Anything else?

[05:02]

Well, I got to be on a podcast for the first time. That’s weird, but also very fun.

[05:08]

Awesome. Well, I’m glad you enjoyed it. Angela, thanks so much for being on the Happy Market Research Podcast.

[05:12]

Thank you.

[05:13]

Enjoy your rest of the time at CRC. And I hope you get some mints.

[06:17]

I’m going right now.

[05:18]

All right.

CRC 2019 Podcast Series

Ep. 238 – 2019 CRC Series – Aaron Hill – Sawtooth Software, Inc.

Welcome to the 2019 CRC Series. Recorded live in Orlando, this series is bringing interviews straight to you from exhibitors and speakers at this year’s event. In this interview, host Jamin Brazil interviews Aaron Hill, Vice President of Client Services at Sawtooth Software, Inc.

Find Aaron Online:

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/aaronhill1

Website: www.sawtoothsoftware.com

Find Jamin Online:

Email: jamin@happymr.com 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazil

Twitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil 

Find Us Online: 

Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch 

Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp 

Website: www.happymr.com 


[00:00]

Hi, this is Jamin. You’re listening to the Happy Market Research Podcast. The next set of episodes are conversations I had at this year’s Corporate Researchers Conference or CRC. This is put on by the Insights Association in Orlando, Florida. I had quite a few interesting conversations highlighting specific companies that exhibited this year as well as a couple of speakers, Wells Fargo, IBM, etc. I hope you have a really good rest of your day and enjoy these short episodes.

[00:32]

I’ve got Aaron Hill with Sawtooth Software. We are live today, Happy Market Research Podcast. CRC is the name of the conference. This is day one. Aaron, it is an absolute honor to have you on the pod.

[00:45]

Thank you so much. It’s great to be here.

[00:46]

I’ve used Sawtooth for, it feels like a hundred years, but it was really, my first experience was 1996. It was a summer; it was sultry. Bryan Orme was the guy… How do you say his last name?

[01:00]

Orm.

[01:01]

Sorry. Orm. I don’t know why I say Orm-e. Anyway, we were doing models. Jamie Plunkett actually was primary with him. Dick McCullough of Macro Consulting was the guy that we worked for—pretty well, respected in the space from an advanced analytics perspective. Tremendous respect for him personally. Anyway, so tell me a little bit about what the Sawtooth is doing these days.

[01:21]

So, Sawtooth right now, we’re always working on new conjoint stuff, working on faster algorithms, easier access to the algorithms and the programs that we’re working on, trying to make it so that we can streamline the processes that people use to analyze their conjoint data.

[01:45]

So, you guys are renowned for your advanced analytics capabilities, right? You’re basically the inventors of ACH, is that right? Or no, no, adaptive conjoint.

[01:56]

Yeah, we developed the adaptive choice-based conjoint algorithms and adaptive conjoint analysis. Most of what we do though isn’t really all that proprietary. So, we rely heavily on amazingly gifted academics and other practitioners. We’ve got a fantastic community of people that help us along. So, we look at it; all we really do is take what other people have done and then make it available for researchers.

[02:24]

The accessibility, I think, is what’s so interesting about your technology. In fact, you do exactly that: Creating partial factorial designs used to be really, really hard. I know that’s a long time ago, but you guys made that really, really easy. And anyway, so essentially, we’re hearing about how you’re focusing more and more on automating the bits and pieces, the process, the research operation consideration.

[02:47]

We’ve taken our online stimulator now. The simulator, they used to have to be an installed piece of software. We put it online; we’ve made it so that you can share it easily with your clients. So that’s the type of development that we’re working on now.

[03:01]

Are you guys doing an event?

[03:03]

Yeah, we just barely held our Sawtooth Software Conference. We do it every 18 months. It was down in San Diego, it is fantastic event. We had about 220-230 people there.

[03:13]

Smart people by the way, folks. So, if you’re looking for somebody to help you with something complex, like a segmentation or optimal pricing or whatever, this is a really good place to be able to network and meet some of the brightest actually, I would say, some of the brightest minds in our field.

[03:33]

Yeah, I think so. Definitely smarter than me.

[03:35]

Oh, everybody’s smarter than me. So, that’s a low bar. Sidebar: I was surprised or am surprised that Qualtrics hasn’t bought you, given you guys are like neighbors. It’s crazy. It just seems like such a perfect fit to me. But anyway, maybe that’s a separate subject.

[03:53]

We’ll just have to partner with you on something.

[03:55]

Oh, I’d love that. That would be really fun. Let’s do that. All right. That’s it. Okay. So, do you attend many conferences?

[04:02]

Personally, I probably go to about six or seven a year.

[04:06]

ROI on conferences. Favorable, works well?

[04:11]

Yeah. Conferences are still a great place to interact with people and reach out. And you’ve got new people coming in. Corporate Researchers is great because it puts us face-to-face with the people that are actually doing the research that need the data. And so, it’s a great time for us to talk to them and see what their needs are. And so, eventually, we can produce products that meet those needs.

[04:35]

Yeah. Market-driven product, right? That’s exactly how you guys have always operated: building from the customer centricity aspect of it. Your pricing model, now I’m really interested in that. So, it used to be a really big heavy load upfront price point. What does that look like now? Is it more of a SaaS model?

[04:51]

So we’ve gone to a subscription model now; so, you pay for it per year. The most popular one includes all of our suite of tools. We’ve been kind of dropping the price point a little bit. So, you can get into all of our stuff for south of $10,000 now.

[05:06]

Guys, just to give you like a point of reference: There was a company called Web TV, which was acquired by Microsoft for $500 million. We used Sawtooth Software to identify their optimal price point. They were at a $200. This is a particular product and software solution for internet access; it goes back more than a few years. So there are a couple of hundred dollars. I want to say it was $300 off the shelf. And by leveraging your software, we identified the optimal price point, which was a $90 set top-box out-of-pocket and then a $40 monthly fee. The break even point for them was around six months, if I can remember correctly, which I’m probably not. But at that point they were making money. So, as soon as they reframed the product price points, then they actually had a material supply problem or a demand problem or, sorry, a supply problem. So they went from not being able to sell anything to, they just didn’t have anything left to sell. Right? It was off the shelf and that’s when Microsoft swooped in. So it was a less than a two-year journey for them. As soon as they did, we leveraged your software, identifying the prop in order to move units and also maximize shareholder value or profit per unit. That model was realized and then it was just like gangbusters and then that Microsoft acquisition. Like there is not enough people doing sophisticated pricing research that should be doing sophisticated pricing research because I see in a lot of cases that people are not charging nearly enough. They could charge two, three, four, ten times more than the are right now. But because they haven’t taken the time to analyze optimal price point for their market, they are literally stealing from themselves.

[07:00]

Yeah, and they’re not meeting the customer needs. So the nice thing about conjoint analysis, not only do you figure out what price people are willing to pay for your product, but you figure out which features they need you to include in the product. So, once you get the features right and the price right, both parties win. The consumers win because they’re getting the actual features that they need. You’re winning because you’re selling it at a price that you can make money off of and everybody’s better off. Everybody’s happier.

[07:25]

It’s called product market fit. Basically, you don’t accidentally happen to get into it or you don’t have to AB test yourself to it. You can literally scientifically in a study identify the features that go into your product that you need to talk about in order to drive your optimal pricing in order to achieve your full potential as a company. So, if you don’t want to do that, that’s fine, but if you do, contact Sawtooth Software. I’m a huge fan. It’s been an honor having you on the podcast. Thank you so much.

[07:55]

Well, thanks seriously so much. It’s great spending time with you.

[07:57]

Yeah. Honestly, this is a highlight for me. His contact information is going to be in the show notes. If you found value in this episode, please take the time to screen capture, share it on social media, tag myself. I’ll repost it. Really appreciate your time and attention. Have a great rest of your day.